When Demons wear Prada

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Renowned media guru, Oprah Winfrey, once admitted in an interview in Time Magazine that during the filming of Beloved, she had moments of “spiritual episodes of divine guidance” that far transcend the chatty exchanges she had with her studio audiences.

She revealed her personal communion with spirits of black slaves from the past which she called upon at will to guide her in her work.

In her words, “I tried to empty myself and let the spirit of Sethe inhabit me … Every morning before my scenes, I lit candles and said the names of these slaves. I prayed everyday to the ancestors.”

The media has caught on the trend of using reality TV shows to titillate viewers with the paranormal and supernatural by igniting their curiosity and/or deepening their fears about spirits from the other dimension.

A 2015 report from Norway indicated that though Norwegians are mandated to belong to the Lutheran church, many of them are now turning to spiritism. “God is out but the spirits and ghosts are filling the vacuum,” said Roar Fortland, a Methodist professor of theology as quoted in the Irish Times.

In spite of the growing skepticism in the modern age, many people are actually seeking to become a part of something bigger, something more significant than themselves.

Every human being has an innate longing to seek fellowship or connection with a higher being, and this is the main reason why people are fascinated with receiving a message or “sign” from forces from another realm.

Unfortunately, many of these seekers are stepping into a terrain forbidden by God and they are interacting with wicked and deceitful spirits dressed up in beautiful “prada.” Here are some of their categories:

I. Cultural or “Regular” Spiritism

Cultural spiritism is the contacting of departed spirits as dictated by various cultures. It is aptly described as “a cult of antiquity” because it is one of the oldest forms of communion with the spirit realm.

Spiritism was known among ancient Egyptians, Chaldeans, Eutricians, Greeks, Romans and Chinese, usually as ancestor worship. Virtually every culture believes in the interaction of the spirits of the departed ones with the living.

In several African cultures, when a person dies, his spirit can be supposedly invoked to know the cause of his death, inquire on how to share his property or even avenge his murder.

In some cases, people are visited by a dead relative in their dreams who informs them where he kept his/her money or what medicine to use for specific ailments, and they find that information to be accurate in reality. They then conclude that dead relatives are still watching over them from the spirit realm.

In 19th century America, spiritism metamorphosed into “regular” spiritism or Spiritualism – an organized self-conscious religion started by Margaret and Kate Fox. It was a diabolic attempt to mimic and counterfeit the huge revivals of the 18th and late 19th centuries in the West.

Spiritualist churches today are modelled after traditional churches. They have their own liturgy, ordained ministers and services (involving prayer, revamped Christian hymns and “messages” or “readings” from spirits), along with public lectures and periodicals.

There are at least five major spiritualist camps in the US where a plethora of occult services are rendered to the public.

In the 1980s, a different dimension of necromancy emerged: mediums  serving as channellers or actual physical voices for particular spirits. Individuals, including some Hollywood stars, have at various times, admitted they had “spirit guides” – spirits of the dead from centuries ago – offering them spiritual insight, wisdom and guidance.

For example, Penny Torres channelled a spirit named “Mafu”; Sharon Gless was a medium of “Lazaris”; Jane Robert channelled “Seth” and J. Z. Knight channelled a spirit named “Ramtha”. Knight in fact, established Ramtha School of Enlightenment in Washington, U.S., attracting all who were thirsty for the waters of New Age mysticism.

Currently, many psychics and mediums – like the Long Island medium, Theresa Caputo, and the South African Cindy Kruger – have carved out a niche for themselves by dishing out messages from the spirit realm to millions of people worldwide, for a price, of course.

And there are also groups of psychics or independent paranormal researchers who make a career out of visiting locations haunted by ghosts or poltergeists and communicating with them.

Many of these spirits make their presence known to seekers by tapping or rapping on walls, moving furniture, flicking or strobing lights, ectoplasms, throwing objects around, playing pianos or turning on appliances.

Notably, most, if not all, of these paranormal locations usually have a history of violent deaths (murder, suicides etc.), abortion, abuse and demon worship. Evil spirits are easily attracted to such places like vultures drawn to carcasses.

These practices – necromancy and consulting with familiar spirits – are condemned by God and the spirits these people are seeing and hearing from are actually demons imitating the dead (Deut. 18:10).

The spirits being contacted by spiritist mediums are the same spirits witches contact from the demonic realm. Their external packaging only slightly differs.

This is why spiritism in any form is dangerous; these seekers are communicating with dark spirits who like their master, are sent to deceive, kill and destroy. Those seeking them have no reliable standards of gauging whether they are being told the truth or are feasting on lies.

II. Shamanism

This involves contacting the spirit world and interacting with spirit entities (deities, ascended masters or energies) there to attain knowledge, healing and power.

The term “shaman” comes from the language of the Tungus tribe in Siberia and refers to a tribal medicine man or witch doctor. A shaman is thus an occult priest/priestess who taps into the spirit realm through dreams, visions or trances at will.

Shamanism exists in different forms, in fact, Anthropologists are intrigued by the fact that shamanism is practiced in every part of the world. This points to the reality of the spirit realm and Satan who “deceives the whole world” through his demons (Rev. 12:9).

Shamanism is based on Pantheism (the belief that God is all and all is God) and Animism (belief that everything is alive and has a soul), so shamans often claim to contact spirits in trees, animals or rocks.

A class of these spirits are called Devas – nature spirits or deities in the plant kingdom. This idea is also subtly relayed in “innocent” children cartoons. For example, in Disney’s Pocahontas, grandmother Willow speaks from a tree to her saying:

“All around you are spirits. They live in the earth, the water, the sky. If you listen they will guide you.

It’s then understandable why Glory Zell, a witch, said this cartoon was “the most pagan-positive movie to ever come out of Disney.”

These devas are often contacted through drugs like marijuana, hashish etc. which enable the shaman to experience the spirit world.

“The key thing with plant shamanism,” says a writer, “is to establish a connection with the plant. Once this is done, the plant spirits themselves teach you everything you need to know and reveal the many ways of using them in healing.”

Shamans also astral travel through “sound of drumming, which encourages ‘dreaming’ patterns to emerge in the brain, taking the shaman deeper into a more holistic experience of the world” (The Sequitur, May, 21, 2016).

Others travel via occult meditation as an ex-Hindu yogi wrote:

During the daily meditation, I began to have visions of psychedelic colors, to hear unearthly music, and to visit exotic planets where the gods conversed with me, encouraging me to attain even higher states of consciousness. Sometimes in my trance, I encountered the same horrible demonic creatures that are depicted by the images in Hindu, Buddhist, Shinto and other religious temples” (Rabindranath Maharaj, Death of a Guru, edited by Dave Hunt, 1985, p. 57)

It’s total folly to worship creatures rather than the Creator (Rom. 1:21-25). God is “the Living God” who is distinct and separate from His creation, hence, He is not a universal force present in rocks or plants (Jer. 10:10-12).

The spirits shamans are in touch with are demons cleverly disguised as nature deities. One evidence of this is the downward spiral in the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual states of those who communicate with them.

Christian researchers, Dr. John Ankerberg and Dr. John Weldon in their article, Nonhereditary Transference of Psychic Powers, gave an example of one psychic who entered a trance state to help an emotionally disturbed woman whose brother had apparently been murdered.

During the trance, the psychic actually “relived” the murder, including experiencing the sheer terror of the victim, and the hatred and revenge of the murderers and the murder itself. “It was all as if it were my own,” she reported. Leaving the condition of the trance was difficult, plus all of the emotions were brought forth into the conscious state where they remained, causing serious mental problems.

III. Apparitions and spiritual manifestations

These can vary with religions, but I want to focus on two specific groups – African syncretic (white garment) churches and Roman Catholicism.

In the former, these spirits are termed “good angels” (malaikas) or “the Holy Spirit” and are often invoked with wild dances, rites involving chanting of Psalms and names of “angels”, prayers with assorted candles, offering sacrifices at specified locations, incense, rituals bathe and invocation at ceremonial altars.

Members of these churches frequently have dreams, visions and supernatural experiences which they fondly assume are “proofs” of divine approval.

Their mediums usually give wild, histrionic “prophesies” which make them glide on floors, hop on one leg like Sandpipers, go into trances, scream like wild animals, or bang their heads on walls. Of course, one will not find a single godly person in Scripture exhibiting such barnyard manifestation while receiving messages from the Holy Spirit.

In Roman Catholicism, on however, the apparitions of “Mary” or the “saints” also convey certain messages, but the primary ways to know they are demonic are:

a) They teach doctrines that contradict or discredit the Bible (Isaiah 8:20)

b) They misrepresent God by either presenting Him as mean and unapproachable or as an indulgent father who approves of their sins (Genesis 3:1-2).

c) They distort the Person of Christ and deny He is the only way to God (John 14:6)

d) They deny the sufficiency of Christ’s sacrifice by teaching the necessity of sacrifices or rituals for sin or receiving blessings from “God” (Hebrews 10:12)

e) They instill fear into people by threatening those who don’t blindly accept their messages with suffering, horrors and death.

I’ve addressed the Marian apparitions in a separate article, but I’ll cite just 2 examples here:

#1 “I alone am able to save you from the calamities which approach. Those who place their confidence in me will be saved” (Teiji Yasuda, Akita: The Tears and Messages of Mary, 1989, 78).

But the Bible says: “I, even I, am the LORD, and apart from me there is no saviour.” (Isaiah 43:11)

#2 “The world is degenerating so much so, that it was necessary for the Father and the Son to send Me into the world among all the peoples, in order to be their Advocate and to save them” (Message given to Ida Peerdeman, April 29, 1951).

But Scripture says: “My little children … And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.” (1 John 2:1-2)

Only a demon would give messages that conflict with God’s Word. Christians don’t need to consult created spirits with limited knowledge or power when they have an all-knowing and all-powerful God.

We “have received … the Spirit which is of God that we might know the things freely given us by God” (1Cor. 2:12).

There is no technique for contacting the Holy Spirit who “guides [us] into all truth … show [us] things to come” (Jn. 16:13). We don’t need to seek out deities, spirits in haunted houses, “saints” or Mary to know God’s purposes for our lives.

The Prophet and his Demons

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Muhammad’s evil ideology can be explained from a Biblical point of view: he was led by evil spirits.

Many Muslims find that statement offensive, but these facts cannot be brushed aside since even the Hadiths and biographies recorded certain unusual experiences Muhammad had.

Understanding the origins of Muhammad’s visions is important. It reveals the spirits behind Islam which control those who submit to it.

According to Islamic records, Muhammad received his call to be a prophet while he was meditating (another version: sleeping) in the cave of Hira which was about 40 miles away from Mecca.

A spirit was said to have appeared to him holding a brocade, saying “Read!” When Muhammad asked “what shall I recite?” the being squeezed him so tightly that he nearly died and asked him to read again. At the third time, the being said “Read in the name of thy Lord who created, who created man of blood coagulated” (The Life of Muhammad, translation of Sirat Rasulallah by Alfred Guillaume, 1955 p. 106).

After the spirit left, Muhammad ran home screaming to his wife, Khadija, “Cover me! cover me!!” and they covered him until his fear was over.

Before this experience, Muhammad had joined a mystic group called the Hanifs who used to meditate in the caves of Hira.

Occult meditation has been an integral part of all Eastern religions and it’s utilized to contact the spirit realm and spirits that masquerade as various deities. Since Muhammad was indulging in this, it’s not a surprise he was visited by a spirit being.

The words of this being is also questionable. Man was not made from coagulated or frozen blood, but from the dust (Gen. 2:27). An angel of God would definitely know this.

And why would God’s angel be terrorizing a man (said to be an illiterate) to read? Doesn’t that sound suspicious?

After this experience, Muhammad didn’t believe he saw an angel of God, given the horrifying experience he had. Khadija then took him to her cousin, Waraqa, a “Christian” priest said to be versed in the Scriptures. Waraqa told Muhammad that what he saw in the cave must have been angel Gabriel who also appeared to Moses (Sira p. 107).

Now, if Waraqa had truly known the Bible as it was claimed, he should have known that angel Gabriel didn’t appear to Moses but rather to Daniel, several centuries after.

Based on this error, Muhammad began to think he was also a prophet like Moses and nicknamed the spirit inspiring him as “Gabriel.”

Waraqa however said:

“Send for [Muhammad] so that I may question him and hear what he says and talk to him. For I am afraid it may be someone other than Gabriel, for certain devils imitate him and by so mislead and corrupt some men. This can result in a man become confused and even crazy whereas he had been of sound mind” (Ibn Kathir, The Life Of the Prophet, Al-Sira al-Nabawiyya, 1:297).

On Biblical grounds, Waraqa was spot on here. This “angel Gabriel” Muhammad was said to have encountered in the cave is very different from the angel Gabriel of the Bible. When he appeared to Daniel:

While he was speaking, I fell face down in a deep sleep. But he lifted me to my feet...” (Dan. 8:18)

When Gabriel suddenly came flying in at the time of the evening sacrifice … he explained: Daniel, I am here to help you understand the vision” (Dan. 9: 21-22).

Angel Gabriel was friendly and helpful, not violent or forceful towards Daniel.

Angel Gabriel also appeared to Zechariah proclaiming that he would give birth to John the baptist who would “make ready a people prepared for the Lord [Jesus]” (Lk. 1:1-20). And he appeared to Mary telling her Jesus would “be great and will be called the Son of God Most High” (Lk. 1:26-38).

On the other hand, the “Gabriel” of Muhammad denied both the Lordship and Sonship of Christ.

Now, why would God send an angel to say one thing to several people and then send him to one pagan man six centuries later to say the opposite? Evidently, Muhammad didn’t encounter an angel of God.

Perhaps to assure his readers that the Gabriel from the cave was confirmed by a Christian, a Quranic translator wrote in his introduction that “Khadija tried the spirit.” By what criteria did Khadija try this spirit?

A hadith says that one day while she was alone with Muhammad (who could see the spirit), she asked him to sit on her lap and he said the spirit was still standing there. Then she exposed her body and Muhammad said the spirit had disappeared. She then declared that the spirit must be an angel of God (Mishkat al-Masabih IV, 154).

According to this silly “test,” a good angel is one that avoids looking at a woman’s nudity! That would have been so absurd, if it wasn’t so laughable. I wonder how much Khadija knew about angels or demons.

From the little recorded about her, she was apparently a heretical Christian. Even by Islamic standards, her deduction is invalid because Muhammad said a woman’s witness is half that of that of a man (Sura 2:282).

As the new Arabian prophet “like Moses,” Muhammad began to boldly recite what the spirit was giving him, but he soon became very depressed and began to contemplate suicide:

“He said ‘I have been meditating throwing myself from a mountain crag, but while I was so meditating, he [Gabriel] appeared to me and said ‘O Muhammad I am Gabriel, and thou are the messenger of God” (Bukhari 9:87:111).

When you compare this to the many prophets in the Bible who encountered God’s angel, you won’t find a single place where anyone of them became depressed and suicidal as a result of that encounter. Remember, Waraqa said evil angels cause mental illness.

When Muhammad left Mecca, he claimed to have met with some spirits/jinn in the desert of Taif and convert some of them to Islam. (If they were good spirits why did they have to be “converted”?).

The statements of these demons are contained in an entire chapter (72) of the Quran. Muhammad told his Muslim followers:

“There is no one among you but a companion among the jinn has been assigned to him’ They said, ‘Even you, O Messenger of Allaah?’ He said ‘Even me, but Allaah has helped me with him and became a Muslim (or I am safe from him) so he only enjoins me to do that which is good” (Muslim, 2814).

These demon guides are called qareen in Islam. Notice that Muhammad himself didn’t deny having a demon guide, but lied that he has made him to become a “Muslim” and he assists him to do good. Actually, Muhammad was outright evil, proving that he was demonized.

On another occasion, Muhammad was sick for 2 or 3 nights. “Then a lady (the wife of Abu Lahab) came and said ‘O Muhammad! I think that your Satan has forsaken you, for I have not seen him with you for two or three nights!” (Bukhari 66:60:475).

Even the Meccan pagans knew he had a demon guide. No Godly prophet in the Bible had demon guides working for or assisting them. That is witchcraft.

The hadiths described how Muhammad used to act whenever he was said to be receiving messages from his “Gabriel.” Such manifestations were disturbing. Little wonder many of the Arabians (who were familiar with demonic activity) knew he was demon-possessed and rejected his claims (Q 81:22, 69:41).

(a) He said: “sometimes it [revelations] comes to me like the ringing of a bell and that is the most troublesome to me” (Mishkat IV, 360). Yet Muhammad himself said elsewhere: “The bell is the musical instrument of Satan” (Muslim, 24:5279).

(b) Aisha reported: “I saw him while the revelation descended on him on an intensely cold day then it left him while his brow steamed with sweat” (Mishkat IV, 360). Extreme perspiration is a common experience spiritists have during mediumship.

(c) He would fall “down unconscious on the ground with both his eyes [open] towards the sky” (Bukhari 6:448). This is how demons manifest (cf. Mk. 9:20).

(d) He would tremble as he laid on the ground like someone having a convulsion (Bukhari 1:4).

(e) He would hear and see things others couldn’t (Bukhari 4:458). These phenomena are called clairaudience and clairvoyance.

(f) He would sometimes snore like a camel. Or sound similar to bees (Bukhari 2:16:354). Demons growl or shriek through people.

(g) He said: “sometimes the angel assumes the form of a man for me and talks with me” (Mishkat IV, 360). This is called materialization.

Anyone familiar with the occult or demonology knows about these experiences which are demonic in nature.

There is not a single prophet of God in the Bible having such strange manifestations when receiving messages from God. Muhammad was deceived by a demon disguised as “an angel of light.”

The messages inspired by this spirit have prevented many Muslims from the truth in Christ and drive them to hate and kill those who follow Him.

New Age or Old Lie?

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In 2002, I came across a lecture by Elizabeth Clare Prophet (of the Church Universal and Triumphant) on TV for the first time. She radiated a sense of wisdom and authority.

She talked about Jesus, quoted Bible verses and laced them with quotes from Eastern religious writings. She was smooth, but I had read about the New Age then, so her philosophies didn’t get to me.

But I don’t think a novice would stand the chance.

The New Age Movement has a wide variety of definitions. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “New Age: of, relating to or being a late 20th century social movement drawing on ancient concepts especially from Eastern and American Indian traditions and incorporating such themes as holism, concern for nature, spirituality and metaphysics.”

New Age spirituality can also be defined as an umbrella of movements that emphasize self-spirituality and the authority of self with a focus on healing through alternative therapies such as Reiki, acupuncture, biofeedback, use of crystals, relaxing music, colour therapy, homeopathy and psychic healing.

They have no central body, leader or founder or a set of rigid doctrines which defines what is to be believed, therefore it’s eclectic. It draws inspiration from Christianity, Judaism, Sufism, Kabbala, New Thought, Taoism, Hermeticism and Neopaganism.

Some New Agers may not use the term “New Age” to describe themselves, but their beliefs are New Age nonetheless. They have their periodicals like the New Age Journal, Gnosis, New Humanity, Alterna and Odyssey.

There are many New Age books, DVDs and websites being distributed worldwide and adherents number into millions. This is why Christians need to be careful of what they devour through books or the Internet.

There is no need for me to list out specific New Age authors. Once you are familiar with their slogans and concepts, you can easily detect them.

In many of their publications you will come across terms like: awakening, awareness, duality, enlightenment, energies, essencing, Christ’s consciousness, higher consciousness, vibrations and a lot of references to “the Universe” or “the Force.”

Other main themes in their teachings are:

I. Our current age is the Age of Pisces marked by ills and wars but a “New Age” or Golden Age is coming, the Age of Aquarius when there will be love, peace, harmony and abundance.

Each New Ager must work towards bringing forth this “New Age” on earth.

II. Positive thinking, thoughts and energies can be used or chanelled by humans to create positive activities, actualize positive goals, usher in the era of the New Age and heal planet earth.

III. Human potential is grossly limited by the mind. So the mind must be liberated from all obstacles in order to maximise human potential and spiritual awareness.

The mind is to be used to create mankind’s personal truth and reality. The methods prescribed for “liberating” the mind range from visualization to “re-birthing” to meditation to shamanism. This is where many Christians are unknowingly trapped.

IV. Man has to evolve by seeking ancient wisdom. One way this is done is by “channelling” – communicating with ascended masters, extraterrestrials, deities, nature spirits, angels and spirit guides.

V. That all things in existence are intricately connected and are part of the divine (pantheism). Therefore, there’s a strong emphasis on nature and earth worship.

History

The New Age can be traced to 19th century metaphysical movements such as:

(a) The New Thought movement, a cult founded by Parkhurst Quimby, a hypnotist, in 1842. This cult was the fountain head of other cults such as Christian Science, Unity School of Christianity and the Church of Religious Science.

Their central belief is that all humans are divine and the mind is to be utilized to dispel sickness and evil.

(b) The Theosophical Society. This was an occult founded by a Russian psychic, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky in 1851 when her “spirit master” Morya contacted her. From there, she travelled to meet shamans and gurus in Mexico, Egypt and Asia.

Her main teaching was that within each person is a divine spark of the Universal Mind which can be expanded by occult mysticism. From Theosophy emerged New Age spirituality.

(c) The Arcane School which was founded by Alice Bailey in 1923. Ms. Bailey was also contacted by a spirit master named Koot Humi and she later joined the Theosophical Society in 1917.

She wrote 18 books through her “master” Djwhal Khu and from her writings came what later became known as the blueprint of the New Age movement.

(d) Organized Spiritualism which was founded by the Fox sisters in the 19th century popularized communications with spirits. This aided and evolved into the New Age practice called “channelling”.

Other key influences in the 20th century were Carl Jung, an occult psychologist who received most of his insights from a demon guide called Philemon, and Edgar Cayce, an occult dream analyst (also called “the sleeping prophet”).

The first Hollywood actress to publicly promote New Age philosophies was Shirley Maclaine with her book and mini-series in 1983 titled Out on a Limb. In these materials, she described her experiences with astral traveling, UFO encounters and other New Age supernatural events.

Through her influence, the New Age became a fad among Hollywood stars like Burt Reynolds, Sylvester Stallone, Lily Tomlin to name a few.

In 1993, Deepak Chopra emerged with his New Age book, Ageless Body, Timeless Mind and he was pushed to fame by another New Age media guru, Oprah Winfrey. Like the pied piper of Hamelin, this woman has single-handedly drawn millions of people (mostly women) worldwide into New Age deception.

For centuries, however, people have been attracted by secret or esoteric knowledge in diverse forms. The spiritual vacuum created by organized religion in the 20th century was one of the factors that opened the door wide to the old religion recycled by Satan to fit into the 21st century.

When people depart from Biblical Christianity to follow such omega “spirituality,” they are following “deceiving spirits and doctrines taught by demons” (1Tim. 4:1).

Now let’s do a brief biblical scrutiny of the major beliefs of New Agers:

God

New Agers believe in an impersonal God beyond all moral or personal distinctions. They believe in monism which asserts that all reality may be reduced to a single, unifying principle partaking of the same essence and reality. New Agers believe all is part of one substance: the Force, the Principle, the One or Mind.

They also embrace Pantheism: all is God and God is all. New Age figure, Benjamin Creme, in his Maitreya’s Mission, puts it:

In a sense there is no such thing as God, God does not exist. And in another sense, there is nothing else but God – only God exists … This microphone is God. This table is God. All is God. And because all is God, there is no God … God is everything that you have ever known or could ever known – and everything beyond your level of knowing.”

Therefore, since you are a god and I am a god, then there is no personal Creator such as Yahweh to be accountable to, and certainly no supreme divine revelation except the one you make up.

So a New Ager lives without any moral or personal boundary or thought of eternal judgement. This relativist philosophy may sound good until one takes his last breath.

Their clams notwithstanding, the true God has set down His truth and a day He will judge the world in righteousness (Acts 17:31).

God has revealed Himself primarily through the things He made, and those who take creatures as creators are fools marked for judgement (Romans 1:28).

Jesus Christ

The only difference between you and Jesus is that he fully realized the Truth about himself and you haven’t – yet” (John Randolph Price, The Super Beings, 1981, p. 57).

On the contrary, Jesus is uniquely the Christ; He is God through whom all things were made and He alone is the God in human flesh (Jn. 1:1-3, 14).

New Agers say Jesus was a mystic who learnt the esoteric secrets of the East from the gurus of India and now he is one of the “ascended masters” in the astral plane.

The real account of Jesus from the age of twelve to thirty was of increasing “in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God” – not in India, but in Nazareth (Lk 2:52).

He “came to Nazareth where he had been brought up: and as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day and stood up for to read” (Luke 4:16).

Having rejected the true Jesus of the Bible, New Agers cling to a false Christ who at times appears to them in trances to deepen their delusion.

Humanity

They teach that humans are divine and all that is needed is for mankind to “awaken to the god who sleeps at the root of the human being.”

This is a key New Age belief. The few Bible texts they have managed to latch onto (or rather misuse) fall apart on closer examination. The Bible is unmistakably clear: there is only one True God (Exodus 20:3).

Salvation

To New Agers, sin or evil is a misconception of Judaeo-Christian tradition:

The idea of ‘original sin’ is totally false” says John Price “The High Religion has nothing to do with sin, only with the spiritual development of man” (The Super Beings, p. 12).

They also believe in karma – that good or bad are cosmically balanced with good or bad results. Thus, since there is no sin, there is no Saviour and no salvation in the New Age.

But the Bible says the opposite: that all men have sinned and are in need of a Saviour (Rom. 3:23, 6:23).

Any solution to the human condition that ignores the depravity of the human heart and God’s perfect work at the cross will not lead to a new age, but the mystery of iniquity.

The Afterlife

New Agers teach that each person must find whatever philosophies suit them about the afterlife – whether its reincarnation, non-existence or a higher plane of consciousness after death.

In reincarnation, with each stage, man evolves higher till he becomes a god or ascended master. They generally reject the reality of heaven and hell or re-interpret them as being old-fashioned or symbolic.

While Christianity has a testimony of a Man, Jesus Christ who was dead for three days, resurrected and returned to testify about life after death, the New Age has no verifiable evidence. They have belief in what their spirit guides or some mystical book says as “proofs.” But these are highly subjective. Only the Bible provides us with the truth.

The many question marks of reincarnation expose it as illogical, unbiblical and fraudulent.

New Age leader, David Spangler once said: “I see the new age not just as a vision but as a very real spirit” (Emergence, the Rebirth of the Sacred, p. 84). Indeed, it is a spirit and it’s of the Father of lies.

Spangler also wrote in Reflections on the Christ: “No one will enter the New Age unless he will take a Luciferian initiation”. In other words, the New Age is Luciferianism. It repeats the same four lies that Satan/Lucifer told Eve in Genesis 3:

1. “Did God really say?” – Denial of the authority and truth of God’s Word.

2. “You shall not die” – Denial of the reality of death; that the dead return to earth or hover around the astral plane.

3. “Your eyes shall be opened” – appeal to human pride by promising the highest wisdom and divine secrets that others do not know.

4. “You shall be gods” – exalting man and depersonalising God. The New Age belief system does not emanate from the God of the Bible.