Was Sunday Observance adopted from Paganism?

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The myth that Sunday was formerly a pagan day of worship of the sun adopted by the church, is a proverbial horse that has been ridden to death. Even worse, this ghostly horse has taken on a life of its own and has moved beyond the religious fringes where it was initially stabled.

The basic idea is this: Sunday was the established day of rest, the weekly holiday in the ancient pagan world. On this day each week, the Romans, Greeks, and other pagans, gathered in temples to worship their pagan gods, particularly the Sun-god—hence the term Sun-day.

This misinformation has been repeated so much that it’s time we threw it in the dustbin for the falsehood that it is.

In two previous articles (one/two), I’ve examined the erroneous claims made by Seventh Day Adventists regarding the Jewish sabbath and the Lord’s day from historical and biblical perspectives.

Now, I still intend to refute the tortuous, incoherent and intellectually suicidal connections they (and other religious groups adhering to the Jewish sabbath) forge between Sunday as a day of worship and ancient Greek or Roman Paganism.

1. Those making this claim of “Sunday stolen from the pagans” usually fail to back it up with historical sources. They will quote virtually anyone but a reputable historian – and by this, I mean someone whose credentials are in History and has published academic works in that field.

If you scan through SDA materials, you will observe the curious absence of citation of primary sources to corroborate their assertion of Sunday being a pagan day. Instead, they conveniently declare this information to be historical “fact” and quickly move on to their next rhetoric.

But on the odd occasion that a source is cited, it’s usually Arthur Weigall’s 1928 work “The Paganism in Our Christianity,” in which he states that the church made Sunday sacred “largely because it was the weekly festival of the sun; for it was a definite Christian policy to take over the pagan festivals endeared to the people by tradition, and to give them a Christian significance” (p. 136).

Aside from the fact that this man had cultic agenda (he was a Unitarian), SDA writers who cite him don’t disclose to their readers that he also declared:

  • The virgin birth is of pagan origin (p. 44)
  •  Jesus’ miracles are of pagan origin (p. 58)
  • Jesus didn’t really die (p. 93)
  • The Jewish Sabbath is of pagan origin (p. 136)

It’s clear that Weigall’s work is a sword that cuts three ways. If it proves Sunday to be a pagan day, it must also prove Saturday to be a pagan day, and if either assertion is to be accepted as valid, then Christianity as a whole would have to be rejected as pagan! Certainly, this is not a source a believer would want to appeal to.

2. A competent study of history and ancient Greek and Roman religions shows that neither the Romans nor the Greeks ever had a regular weekly day of rest from secular work.

Neither did they have a regular weekly festival day. They didn’t have a regular day of the week on which they gathered for pagan worship. These are facts of history.

Dudley M. Canright, a Seventh-Day Adventist pastor, researched these facts early in the 20th century. He sincerely believed Sunday worship came from paganism—since this teaching had been passed on to him. But when he began to look into the subject more fully, he came to a different conclusion.

It was at his time (c. 1913-1914) that he contacted four Greek and Roman history scholars with ten questions that he submitted to them separately. These scholars were:

F. N. Pryce of the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum.

R. Rathborn of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington.

George F. Moore, Professor of Ancient Roman and Greek History, Harvard University in Cambridge.

Prof. W. H. Westerman of the University of Wisconsin.

D. M. Canright reminds us that: “All four of these specialists in ancient history agree in answering these questions though neither one knew that they had been submitted to the others yet all four exactly agree in every particular, though widely scattered … Such a unanimous agreement would settle any question in a court of law.”

These findings were published in his work, The Lord’s Day From Neither Catholics or Pagans. I reproduce here only two of the historians’ answers:

From the world renowned British Museum in London, England, Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities

Sir: I am commanded by the Assistant Keeper of Greek and Roman Antiquities to reply as follows to your questions on the ancient week:

Q. 1. Did the pagan Romans and Greeks ever have any regular weekly day of rest from secular work?
Ans. No.

Q. 2. Did they have any regular weekly festival day?
Ans. No.

Q. 3. Did they have any regular weekly day when they assembled for pagan worship?
Ans. No.

Q. 4. Did they have any special day of the week when individuals went to the temples to pray or make offerings?

Ans. No; both for Greeks and Romans the month was the unit and not the week. The Greek calendar varied in different states but the month was generally divided into three periods of ten days. The Romans reckoned from three fixed points in the month, the Kalend or first, the Nones fifth or seventh, the Ides thirteenth or fifteenth. These subdivisions in themselves had no religious significance.

Also in the Roman calendars were nundinal, or market days, at periods of eight days, or, as the Romans reckoned time. On these days farm work, etc., stopped and citizens flocked into the town markets. To some extent this may be a regular stoppage of secular work.; but it had no religious significance, except that it was considered an evil omen when the nundinal coincided with other festival days, e. g., the: Nones. The nundinal period seems derived from a blundering reminiscence of a quarter of a lunar period, and there seems no connection with the later seven days’ week (see below).

Q. 5. As Sunday was sacred to the Sun, Monday to the Moon, Saturday to Saturn, etc., were those supposed deities worshipped on their own particular days more than on any other days?

Ans. No; the old worship of the gods was disappearing when the seven-day week came about. The significance of the deities’ names was astrological, not religious, e.g., if a person were born on Monday, the moon would influence his horoscope, but the moon was never an object of common worship.

Q. 6. When was our week of seven days first introduced into the Roman calendar?

Ans. There are traces in the literature of the late republic (first cent. B.C.) that the Romans used the week of seven days for astrological purposes, in connection with the many Eastern superstitions of the period. It was probably the third century, A.D. before the seven day week came into common use.

Q. 7. From whom did the Romans learn the week of seven days?

Ans. From the Jews, alternately the Assyrians and Babylonians; the names were probably fixed by the Hellenistic Greeks.

Q. 8. Did the pagan Greeks ever adopt in common life, or in their calendar, the week of seven days?
Ans. No.

Q. 9. Did Apollo, the Sun god, either among the Romans or Greeks, have any special day on which he was worshipped with prayers or offerings more than on any other day?

Ans. There were certain set festivals at various temples; these were annual, not weekly.

Q. 10. Did the pagan reverence for Sunday have anything to do in influencing Christians to select that day as their rest day?

Ans. No; it can hardly be said that there was any special reverence for Sunday in pagan times (see answer to No. 5).

I am, sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. N. PRYCE.

3. The following was the response from George Moore, Professor of Ancient Roman and Greek History, at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Dear Sir:

There are two seven-day weeks: the Jewish week, with a Sabbath on the seventh day; and the Astrological week, with days named after the sun, moon, and five planets, in our order determined by the theories of astrology, but without any day of rest

The Astrological week first appears in Greek and Latin writings about the beginning of the Christian era … It had no use in ordinary life. Abstinence from labor on the seventh day, or on one day in seven, is a distinctively Jewish institution.

The edict of Constantine (321 A.D.) closing the courts on Sunday and prohibiting some kinds of labor on that day, is the first recognition of a seven-day week in Roman law. The ancient Romans had a market day every eight days, when the peasants came to town to market, but it was in no sense a day of rest.

In the old Roman calendar there were many days when the courts were closed and other public and private business was not done. They had also many festivals on which the people left their ordinary occupation to take part in the celebrations, but these have no periodicity like that of the week

The planetary week in which the days were named from their regents, Saturday, Sunday, etc., was an invention of the astrologers, probably in the second century, B.C., and has no relation to religion or influence upon it. Saturn, for example, was not worshipped on Saturday, nor Jupiter on Thursday. The festivals of the several gods were never weekly festivals, nor did they occur on days fixed by other divisions of the month, say the tenth day …

Private persons went to the temples when they had occasion to offer prayers or sacrifices or to make vows, etc. There were no stated days for such visits-though some days were in some temples luckier than others, and there was nothing like a stated day for the assembling of a worshipping congregation except the festivals of the local calendar.

Very truly yours,
George F. Moore.

4. One of the most detailed works on ancient Roman religion that I’ve read is, The Roman Festivals of the Period of the Republic by Warde W. Fowler (The Project Gutenberg, e-book released in 2009).

In it, Fowler describes Roman festivals in detail but says nothing about a weekly day of worship. This would have been a strange omission if Sunday had been “a venerable day of the sun” observed by pagans in Rome. Instead, the work shows that their festivals were seasonal or monthly.

The Roman annual calendar started on March 1; April was regarded as the month of opening or unfolding vegetation; May was the month of growing and June, the month of ripening and perfecting.

The Roman calendar at the time of Christ was divided into months, not weeks; they didn’t use our modern calendar. Therefore, the idea that the Romans specially worshipped the sun on Sunday, the moon on Monday or Frigg on Friday is a hoax.

5. The Encylopedia Britannica, article “Week” says: “For a time the Romans used a period of eight days in civil practice, but in AD 321 Emperor Constantine established the seven-day week in the Roman calendar and designated Sunday as the first day of the week.”

The Encylopedia Americana on the same topic says, “The Romans and Greeks …were not acquainted with the week till a late period. The Romans had, however, for civil uses, as the arrangement of market days, a cycle of eight days, the ninth being the recurring one, instead of the eighth as with us.”

In other words, the edict of Constantine in 321 A.D. was the first time in Roman law that Sunday was set aside as a holiday. It simply means before then it wasn’t recognized as a pagan holiday of the Empire. Before Constantine, the Roman Empire had eight days in a week (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, then 1, 2, 3, 4 etc.), but he made it into seven (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 then 1, 2, 3, 4 etc)

Assuming the Roman or Greek festivals were observed weekly, this calendar eliminates the possibility of pagans holding a feast for the same deity on the same day of the week, let alone being adopted by the church. Ralph E. Woodrow aptly pointed this out:

“Now this should be carefully noticed. IF pagans gathered on the first day of the week to worship Apollo, Mithra, or some other Sun-god, this would not correspond, week after week, to what we call Sunday. For example: Suppose our calendar had eight days in a week (instead of seven), and we met for Christian worship at seven day intervals. This would require a change of day each week!

“If we met the first week on Saturday, seven days later we would meet on Friday. Seven days later we would meet on Thursday. Seven days later we would meet on Wednesday, etc. There is simply no way that the first day—of an eight-day cycle—will consistently correspond with the first day of a seven-day cycle. This cries out in a loud voice, then, that the pagan Romans did not observe what we call Sunday as a weekly sacred day!” (Did Sunday Worship Come from Paganism? Palm Springs, CA., February 1999, p. 3).

It’s one thing for a denomination to say, “We meet for worship on Saturdays because we believe the New Testament does not really impose any particular day on believers, but gives us freedom to choose our own day of gathering for worship in church” – which is biblically fair. And I personally respect such sincere differences.

But it becomes a totally different ball game when a sect dogmatically says, “Sunday observance came from paganism! It originated from the worship of the Sun god in Rome and it won out because church leaders rebelled against God’s law. Sunday means ‘day of the sun,’ so if you go to a church on a Sunday, you are worshipping the sun god – Satan, and God told us through a 19th century visionary that Sunday worshippers will receive the mark of the Beast!”

This is a rhetoric laden with gross misinformation, falsehoods, fanaticism, poisoning the well, and religious mind control.

The Sabbath Controversy (2)

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The quotes here are from Ellen White’s book, The Desire of Ages:

The Sabbath was hallowed at creation … He [God] gave it to Adam as a day of rest. It was a memorial of the work of creation, and thus a sign of God’s power and love” (p. 281).

This is false. God created Adam on the 6th day and he worked for one day naming the animals (Gen. 1:24-31, 2:7), therefore, God’s 7th day of rest could not be the same as man’s day of rest.

Adam only worked for one day, whereas 6 days of work are required before the sabbath (Exo. 20:8-11).

Nowhere did God command Adam to observe the 7th day which He rested on and sanctified. God didn’t continue observing such a “rest day” because man sinned almost immediately and He began the work of redemption (Gen. 3:8-21).

Ellen: “The Sabbath was not for Israel merely, but for the world. It had been made known to man in Eden, and, like the other precepts of the Decalogue, it is of imperishable obligation.”

First, there is no record of any sabbath kept by man for at least 2,513 years before the Law was given. That is why the word “sabbath” does not occur once in the book of Genesis.

Patriarchs like Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob or Joseph who were friends of God never observed the sabbath. That would have been very strange if the 7th day sabbath was “made known to man in Eden” or was an “imperishable obligation.”

Second, there were no 10 commandments before Sinai. The word “sabbath” occurs first in Exodus 16:25 where God commanded Israel to not gather manna on the 7th day.

In Deut. 5:15, God commanded the sabbath as a memorial of Israel deliverance from the land of Egypt. It was not a commemoration of God’s rest upon completing His creation work. Verses 2-3 make it clear that this observance was not given to their fathers before them:

“The LORD our God made a covenant with us in Horeb. The LORD made not this covenant with our fathers, but with us…”

The old covenant was between God and the nation of Israel not with the church (1 Kings 8:21, 2Chr. 6:11). The sabbath being part of it, had a special significance to them, not to the world. God was specific about the recipients of His laws:

“See that the LORD has given you the sabbath, therefore He giveth you on the sixth day the bread of two days…” (Exodus 16:29)

“Speak thou also unto the children of Israel, saying, Verily my sabbaths ye shall keep: for it is a sign between me and you throughout your generations that ye may know that I am the LORD that doth sanctify you. (Exo. 31:13)

“Moreover also I gave them my sabbaths, to be a sign between me and them, that they might know that I am the LORD that sanctify them.” (Ezekiel 20:12)

The sabbath was not made mandatory on Gentiles. If they wished to be a part of Israel, they could only do so by meeting certain requirements like circumcision (Ex. 12:48) and an offering (Num 15:14) before all the Jewish sabbath laws could apply to them.

Ellen: “Of that law of which the fourth commandment forms a part, Christ declares, ‘Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law … So long as the heavens and the earth endure, the Sabbath will continue as a sign of the Creator’s power … it’s is the Lord’s day.” (p 289)

There’s a batch of leaven mixed into the yeast here. Jesus omitted the 4th commandment when He summed up the 10 commandments (Matt. 22:37-40).

Ellen White glibly left out “till all be fulfilled” out of her quotation of Matthew 5:18. Jesus came to fulfil the law. The term “fulfil” has been explained here. The sabbath was part of the law and it ended when the law was abolished at Calvary (Eph. 2:15, Rom. 7:4-6). Mrs White craftily mixed her own ideas into Scripture to condition her readers into her interpretation.

SDAs quote Jesus’ words in Mark 2:27-28 “The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath. Therefore the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath.”

This actually means the sabbath should not be lorded over man. Man is free to do that which is good and best for man on rest days. Jesus Himself broke the sabbath by healing on it. The requirements Ellen White bound SDAs under for the sabbath are unbiblical.

Why Christians Consider Sunday?

1. The word sabbath occurs 60 times in the N.T. It was used 50 times in reference to before the new covenant was made. Of the remaining 10 times, 6 refers to Paul preaching to the Jews at non-Christian gatherings on Jewish sabbath days (Acts 13:14, 42, 44; 17:1, 18:4).

Two refers to Jews in their synagogues (Acts 13:27, 15:21). The last 2 references are to the Jewish travel on a sabbath day (Acts 1:12) and its abolishment at Calvary (Col. 2:14-17). At no point is it used in connection with Christians observing it.

2. The resurrection of Christ was on “the first day of the week” (Jn. 20:1, 19, 26-29) and the early Christians met on the “first day of the week” (Acts 20:6-12, 1Cor. 16:1-2).

There’s no justification for toe-dancing these passages away unless one is committed to Ellen White’s belief system.

3. Christ’s special manifestations to His disciples after the resurrection were on the first day of the week (Mt. 28, Mk. 16, Lk. 23-24). Nowhere did He or His apostles recognize the old Jewish sabbath after the resurrection.

4. The outpouring of the Holy Spirit was on the first day of the week, the day after 7 Jewish sabbaths (Acts 2:1). Even in the OT, God honoured the eighth day (Lev. 9:1-2, 14:23, 22:27, Neh. 8:18)

5. The New covenant does not command any particular day to be observed by Christians. We are free to choose our day of rest:

“One man considers one day more sacred than another; another man considers every day alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind” (Rom. 14:5).

Paul counters the SDA sabbath keeping as a “turning back to those weak and miserable principles … You are observing special days and months and seasons and years!” (Gal. 4:9-10).

6. We are commanded to not permit any man judge us regarding sabbaths (Col. 2:14-17). It’s only a token or figure – like circumcision – which has nothing to do with the church.

Even in the OT, God proclaimed the discontinuation of all the sabbaths. (Isa. 1:13, Jer. 31:31-34)

7. Sabbaths are not included among the necessary requirements of the gospel in the N.T. Therefore, its rank heresy to teach that those who don’t keep the sabbath will be eternally lost (Acts 15:1-29)

8. Rest and eternal rest is in Christ, not in a day (Heb. 4). For SDAs to pick the sabbath out of the OT laws to observe means they are under an obligation to keep the whole law. In that case, their trust is not in Christ but the law. True Christians are disciples of Christ, not of Moses (Gal. 3:10-14, James 2:10)

9. Nowhere did Christ warn against the “sin” or “mark of the beast” of observing the first day of the week as SDA’s prophetess taught. Had there been any explicit commands to worship on any day, (even the first day) it would have brought about the same bondage as the law of Moses.

The New Covenant frees from the bondage and death penalties of breaking the OT laws. If SDAs are going to be consistent with the sabbath laws, they will have to start killing people who break the sabbath.

Mutant Bible Alert!

In 1994, David Blancho, an Adventist scholar produced a Bible translation, The Clear Word (TCW) which paraphrases the King James Version, but it alters the texts and lace them with Ellen White’s extra biblical teachings. Though SDAs don’t consider it official, this mutant bible is often used to indoctrinate SDA converts. Here are some examples, with the altered texts appearing in bold:

I. Exodus 5:5 “You’ve created enough problems by making them rest every week on your Sabbath

In the KJV, Pharaoh’s words were “and ye make them rest from their burdens.” There was no weekly sabbath at the time. Moses was only requesting 3 days for the Israelites to worship God. It is anachronistic to use the word “sabbath” at that time.

II. Exodus 16:5 “On the sixth day they should gather twice as much as on the other days so as to have enough for the seventh day, which is the Sabbath, the day I set aside for worship and rest.

Those added words are not found in any Bible manuscript. They were smuggled there to reinforce SDA belief.

III. Exodus 31:13-14 “Say to the people, ‘Most importantly, remember to keep the Sabbath holy because it is a very special day for me, and its a day of rest for you … The Sabbath is holy and anyone who desecrates it by working on that day will be put to death, since that would be an act of treason against God’s government. My people are to keep the Sabbath, celebrating it as a sign that they belong to me…”

Compare this to your Bible and you will see that the words “children of Israel” has been replaced here with “My people” and the text has been changed to universalize the sabbath as if those who don’t observe it are acting in treason against God’s rule.

IV. Acts 20:7 “After sundown on Saturday night , the believers got together for a fellowship meal and to say goodbye to Paul. That evening he spoke to them until midnight, after which he hoped to get a few hours sleep before leaving early Sunday morning.”

Notice how the “first day of the week” in the Bible was replaced with “on Saturday.” They also altered the term “break bread” used by the early church for communion to “a fellowship meal and to say goodbye to Paul.” Such shameless revision of the Bible was intended to convince people that early Christians never worshiped on Sundays.

V. Col. 2:16 “Don’t let anyone control your life by giving you a set of ceremonial rules about what to eat, what to drink and what monthly festivals or special Sabbaths to keep.”

Compare this with the KJV: “Let no man judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of a holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days.” This verse poses a problem to SDA doctrine, so they expunged the “holy day” and altered the verse to imply that only the “special sabbaths” are no more binding. That verse refers to all sabbaths, including the 7th day sabbath.

VI. Heb. 4:4 “That’s why at creation He gave man the seventh-day sabbath, not only as a reminder of creation week, but also as a symbol of spiritual rest. According to the Scriptures, God Himself rested on the seventh day and enjoyed this special time with man.

Compare this to the KJV: “For he spake of a certain place of the seventh day on this wise. And God did rest the seventh day from all his works.” The TCW laces the verse with Adventist flavours like “creation week”, “symbol of spiritual rest” “[God] enjoyed this special time with man.”

VII. Rev. 1:10 “On Sabbath morning when I had gone to the rocky island shore to meditate and worship.”

Compare this with the KJV: “I was in the Spirit on the Lord’s day, and heard behind me a great voice as of a trumpet.” The TCW has mutilated the text that it’s barely recognizable. They pushed the word “in the Spirit” into the closet, switch “the Lord’s day” into “Sabbath morning” and import SDA liturgy (“meditate and worship”) into it and apostle John comes out as a first century Seventh Day Adventist!

These tell us they too are aware that their doctrines are unbiblical. A “church” that tampers with God’s Word is not of God. God has exalted His Word above all His name, so those who alter His word are in trouble with Him.

Adventists teach that Catholicism is the Great Harlot because she changed God’s laws, sadly the SDA church is guilty of the same: changing the Word of God to suit her beliefs. They have not “renounced the hidden things of dishonesty” but rather walk in craftiness by “handling the word of God deceitfully” (2Cor. 4:2). True Believers must also flee from Ellen White’s system.

The Sabbath Controversy (1)

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The observance of the Saturday sabbath is a core belief of Seventh Day Adventists and some other religious sects. Considering the level of indoctrination and confusion disseminated by sabbatarians, this issue needs to be addressed.

When a lie is being repeated over and over again, it becomes very believable, most especially when those teaching the lie succeed in poisoning the minds of their listeners against those who disagree.

Before venturing into what Scripture says about the sabbath at all (that will be in Part 2), there is a need to first refute some blatantly false claims or premises planted into the minds of Seventh Day Adventists (SDAs).

They hold Ellen White’s writings as “a continuing and an authoritative source of truth.” Granted, the moment one accepts her visions and teachings as authoritative, one embraces sabbath-keeping as well therefore her claims demands scrutiny.

1. The Sabbath is the Mark of the True Church

She wrote:

I saw that the holy Sabbath is, and will be the separating wall between the true Israel of God and unbelievers, and that the Sabbath is the great question to unite the hearts of God’s dear waiting saints” (Early Writings, 1963, p. 33).

This is predicated on the error that the church has replaced Israel, and by implication, what applied to Israel now applies to the church (Replacement theology). This is incorrect.

While Israel consists of one nationality, the church consists of every tongue, tribe and nation. Israel was given a land with specific promises attached, but the church is not restricted to a geographical location.

Her statement also reflects the typical we-vs-them mentality. She calls Adventists the “true Israel” while non-Adventists are labelled as “unbelievers.”

SDAs believe that keeping the 7th day sabbath was “not a new truth discovered by Adventists, but a truth that was taught by Christ, and the apostles and by the church in the wilderness, a truth finally recaptured and proclaimed once again by the remnant” (Prophecy Seminar # 26).

But SDAs didn’t exist until the 19th century and there wasn’t a single Christian group that kept the sabbath until then.

Either true Christians missed this vital truth for 18 centuries or this was a tragic drawback into the bondage of the Law after 18 centuries.

2. The Early Christians Kept the Sabbath

In the first centuries the true Sabbath had been kept by all Christians… [until] the early part of the fourth century [when] the emperor Constantine issued a decree making Sunday a public festival throughout the Roman Empire” (The Great Controversy, 52)

This is historically false. There is no evidence that all the early Christians kept the sabbath for centuries. This can be seen from the writings of early church leaders before Constantine:

Ignatius of Antioch (30-107): “Those who were brought up in the ancient order of things [Jews] have come to the possession of a new hope, no longer observing the Sabbath, but living in the observance of the Lord’s day, on which also our life has sprung up again by him and by his death” (Letter to the Magnesians, 9)

Epistle of Barnabas (ascribed to Paul’s companion by Clement):
“He says to them. ‘Your new moons and your sabbaths I cannot endure’ (Isa. 1:13). Ye perceive how He speaks: Your present sabbaths are not acceptable to me…I will make a beginning of the eighth day, that is, a beginning of another world. Wherefore, also we keep the eighth day with joyfulness, the day on which Jesus rose again from the dead.”

Justin Martyr (100-165 AD): “How is it, Typho, that we would not observe those rites which do not harm us – I speak of fleshy circumcision, and sabbaths, and feasts?… God enjoined you to keep the Sabbath and imposed on you other precepts for a sign … The Gentiles, who have believed in Him, and who have repented from their sins … shall receive the inheritance along with the patriarchs … even although they neither keep the sabbath, nor are circumcised nor observe the feasts …Christ is useless to those who observe the law” (Dialogue with Trypho the Jew, 18, 21).

“But Sunday is the day on which we hold our common assembly, because it is the first day on which God, having wrought a change in the darkness and matter made the world; and Jesus Christ our Savior on the same day rose from the dead” (1 Apology, 67, 6).

Tertullian (b 145): “The Holy Spirit upbraids the Jews for their holy days. ‘Your sabbaths, and new moons, and ceremonies my soul hateth … By us [Christians], to whom sabbaths are strange… to the heathen each festive day occurs but once annually; you [Christians] have a festive day every eighth day.” (The Ante-Nicene Fathers 3:70)

Ireneaus (b 178): “The mystery of the Lord’s resurrection may not be celebrated on any other day than the Lord’s day and on this alone should we observe the breaking of the Paschal Feast … Pentecost fell on the first day of the week, and was therefore associated with the Lord’s day” (ANF VII, 447)

3. Constantine made Sunday the Day of Worship

It was on behalf of Sunday that popery first asserted its arrogant claims; and its first resort to the power of the state to compel the observance of Sunday as ‘the Lord Day‘” (GC p 447)

This claim is devoid of truth. The Edict of Laodicea issued in AD 321 didn’t impose Sunday as the Lord’s Day, rather it made it a civil holiday. Sunday had been a day of worship for Christians for 3 centuries before.

The edict was majorly directed at pagan business men who felt everyday should be a business day. The church of Rome didn’t even have the power at that time to enforce any laws.

SDA theologian, Dr Samuele Bacchiochi admitted this glaring error in Mrs White’s book:

“But at this time, the Bishop of Rome could not call upon ‘the power of the state’ to compel the observance of Sunday as the Lord’s day, because in the eyes of the Romans, Christianity was still a suspicious religion to be suppressed, rather than to be supported” (Endtime Issues, 87, Par. 1).

4. Sunday is a Pagan Day

As support, SDAs quote from 19th century anti-Christian works that attempt to link everything in Christianity with paganism. For example, they quote from Arthur Weigall’s The Paganism in Our Christianity:

“But, as a solar festival, Sunday was the sacred day of Mithra … The Lord’s day [Sunday] is of Pagan origin..” (pp. 136, 210)

What SDA leaders hide from their followers is that this is a thoroughly anti-Christian work that also states:
i- The 27 books of the New Testament are false (p. 37)
ii-The account of Jesus’ birth is pagan (p. 52)
iii-The 12 disciples of Christ are from the 12 zodiac signs. (p. 25)
iv- The virgin birth is pagan (p. 44)
v- The miracles of Christ are of pagan origin (p. 58)
vi- The crucifixion account is pagan (p. 69)
vii- The ascension of Christ is of pagan origin (p. 100)
viii- Both the Jewish sabbath and Sunday the Lord’s day are pagan days. Let me quote this:

The origin of the seven-day week which was used by the Jews and certain peoples, but not till later by Greeks or Romans is to be sought in some primitive worship of the moon, for the keeping the day of the new moon as festivals which is widely found in antiquity… the institution is obviously derived from moon worship...” (pp. 209-211)

Using SDA logic, Sunday came from pagan sun worship while the sabbath came from pagan moon worship!

The fact is, almost every day of the week can be linked to paganism – if one decides to live in that cave. These works are too biased to be quoted as authorities. Their theories have been refuted by modern scholars.

Not only are SDAs appealing to books authored by Bible-haters, they are also being dishonest in their citations because their conclusions refute their own position.

5. Sunday is a Man-made institution

Vast councils were held from time to time, in which the dignitaries of the church convened from all the world. In nearly every council, the Sabbath which God has instituted was pressed down a little lower, while the Sunday was correspondingly exalted” (GC, 53).

The councils being referred to are the ecumenical councils. The first seven of them are the Council of Nicaea (325), Constantinople I (381), Ephesus (431), Chalcedon (451), Constantinople II (553), Constantinople III (680) and Nicaea II (787).

In all these councils, there is not a single one in which the issue of Sabbath/Sunday was ever debated. One doesn’t need to be receiving “angelic visions” to know this simple fact.

6. Sunday-Keepers will receive the Mark of the Beast

When the test comes, it will be clearly shown what the mark of the beast is. It is the keeping of Sunday.” (SDA Bible Commentary, 7:980)

By what criterion will one receive this mark? In 1897, she wrote: “When you obey the decree that commands you to cease from labor on Sunday and worship God … you consent to receive the Mark of the Beast” (Review and Herald)

Another early SDA leader wrote: “It is very clear therefore, that in order to keep the sabbath day according to the commandments we must not only rest on the seventh day, but we must also habitually treat all other days of the week as working days” (E. J. Waggoner, Review and Sabbath Herald, April 16, 1895).

In other words, SDAs must labour and never worship on Sunday or they will receive the mark of the beast. Yet in utter contradiction we read later:

And never must we say to them, ‘You must work on Sunday’ … Give Sunday to the Lord as a day for doing missionary work. Take the student out to hold meetings in different places, and do medical missionary work” (The General Conference Bulletin, April 14, 1903).

One does not receive the mark of the beast because he shows that he realises the wisdom of keeping peace by refraining from work that gives offence. On this day open-air meetings and cottage meetings can be held. House-to-house work can be done.Whenever its possible, let religious services be held on Sunday. Make these meetings intensely interesting. Sing genuine revival hymns and speak with power and assurance of the Saviour’s love” (Testimonies to the Church, Vol. 9, 232-33).

So it was now acceptable to conduct missionary works, do works “that gives no offense,” hold religious services, assemble with other Christians and sing hymns on Sunday.

We need to ask, who changed the criteria? Why the blowing hot and cold and flip-flop laws? If this prophetess couldn’t get her criteria of the “mark of the beast” straight why take the rest of her claims about it as truth?

6. Christians in the Dark Ages kept the Sabbath

Through the ages of darkness and apostasy there were Waldenses who denied the supremacy of Rome … rejected image worship as idolatry, and who kept the true Sabbath. Under the fiercest tempest of oppositions they maintained their faith” (GC, 65)

What a ridiculous statement. There is absolutely no historical evidence to support the idea that the Waldenses kept the sabbath or were persecuted for not giving it up.

It seems Mrs White was confused about the nickname “insabbati” which the Waldenses were called, but this word has nothing to do with sabbath-keeping. The word is derived from “sabbatum” the Latin word for sandals, and the term “insabbati” was used to mock the Waldenses because of the sandals they were known to wear.

Mrs White was obviously trying to make up a quasi history to fill up the 15 century gap of “Christian sabbath keepers” – as if it wasn’t a 19th century innovation.

But such a fancy claim militates against her alleged heavenly visions. Having rebutted the arguments used to cloud the minds of SDAs, let’s now proceed to the Bible’s view of the sabbath.