An Exchange on Unbroken Racism and Rebecca Yoder’s Heresies

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After my previous post on Unbroken Racism, Fanaticism and Paranoia, one of Rebecca Yoder’s loyal fans named SaintAdama, responded on Facebook and I replied to his comments. Eventually, it thinned out to a monologue (just as I predicted).

I particularly welcomed his critique because he’s a guy who follows my page and appears to be knowledgeable.

Aside from that, he will be the first individual to come to Rebecca Yoder’s defense since 2016 when I began to openly expose the pair on this blog.

His words appear in blue.

Well, I have personally read about 4 of Rebecca Brown’s books and I do not see anything wrong with them. Though I am yet to read unbroken curses. I think you may be over reacting.

I have a copy of “He came to set the captives free” here. Please can you mention the pages where she refer to the African-American couple as Mr and Mrs Black or Negro? Let me check it.

If you don’t see anything wrong with any aspect of her books, then you need to check your discerning level. Even back then when I was her loyal fan, I found some of her stories hard to relate to.

If you have not read Unbroken Curses, then you can’t be saying I’m overreacting.

The part you asked for is in chapter 19 titled Straight Talk To Those Who Want to Come Out of the Occult. It’s also available online.

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[Responding to another commenter]:

No! She is not too conscious of demonic activities. I think anyone who is not called into a ministry as she is called will find it hard to understand her.

She is called into HARD CORE spiritual warfare. This involves intense battle with demonic forces and in this battle, you would need to be able to discern spirits and that is why one of the gift of the Holy Spirit is DISCERNMENT … I have found her teachings to be scripturally sound.

Saint Adama, I will appeal to you to apply that discernment you speak of.

I once read about a case of a food vendor in the streets of New York who sold a bagel and cream cheese sandwich with a cockroach in it. Would it kill his customer? No, but it will cause problems.

Imagine someone telling that customer to ignore the bug in his food and focus on its sweet taste. That’s the issue with false teachings. Not all of them kill, because they are often mixed up with ice cream.

To be clear, Rebecca Brown had some things right. I can even say that she got a clearer perspective of certain issues than some pastors. But that doesn’t mean everything she taught was true or biblical.

In fact, I have stated it over and over that I will not recommend her book for any Christian because they also contain some damaging statements, misinterpreted bible verses, contradictions, fictitious claims, demonic obsession and full-blown paranoia.

I still remember the level of mistrust her book, Becoming a Vessel of Honor, put in my heart at the age of 16.

I have documented these in my previous post and a three-part series and this [latest] one.

Read it first, check out what is being discussed, then we can dialogue. Let’s not be closed minded. Otherwise, what will be achieved will be a mutual monologue.

Her book: Becoming a vessel did not put any mistrust in my heart. I agree with you that her book should not be recommended for a New Christian because her books are certainly not for baby Christians. They are for the matured who are capable of handling strong bones and deep things.

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I read the post twice to actually understand what the fault is. But I have not read her book titled: Unbroken Curses. The ones I have read are : Becoming a vessel of honor (in the master’s service), Prepare for War, He came to set the Captives free and Standing on the rock. These are the four of her books that I have read so far. And presently I have the last 3 of them listed in the house here.

If I am to judge by the quotes extracted from her book (Unbroken curses) as given in the post, personally I didn’t see anything wrong with what she said about Africa except that she did say all of it. What I mean by “she didn’t say all of it” is that she seem to be ignorant of the fact that the Western powers are also complicit in many of the violence and wars that have ravaged the black continent.

Apart from that, I do not see how wrong she is in saying that the whole continent of Africa is Characterised by tribal warfare

Absolutely wrong. The vast majority of North Africa was conquered by the Arabs. The southern region and several other countries were held in the tight grip of [western] colonial powers. The people had to fight to be free.

that each tribe is consequently ruled by demon gods

Such as? Let’s start with Nigeria. It has no less than 200 ethnic groups. Please, tell me the demon gods controlling each one and how you came to realize this marvelous truth.

because the people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers

That’s completely untrue. And you as an African ought to be more informed about your own continent than a sequestered Westerner writing from the Ozarks mountains of Arkansas.

Can you compare the level of idolatry in any state in Nigeria with what was described 50, 60 or 100 years ago when the colonialists first landed on our shores?

How many pagan shrines are still standing and being patronized? How many adherents of paganism do we have in South Western Nigeria alone?

that the whole history of Africa has been incessant warfare and massacres among tribes

Unfortunately, that statement trades on the ignorance of folks who assume Africa is a country rather than a continent.

Can you speak of the whole history of Nigeria alone and conclude it’s of tribal warfare? No. Then you can’t speak for the whole of Africa consisting of many countries.

The sins of the fore fathers which she claim the Africans have not broken from is simply IDOLATRY. Is this not true?

Not at all. That’s why you ought to have read the book first or read the [post] carefully. She said sins (plural). She referred to them as “demon worship and hatred and warfare” (p. 32).

I argue that such sins are also in the West, East, North and South of the world. Why are they not dying like flies like “cursed” Africa? Are you following my gist? Please do.

I know how rampant the worshipping of idols were in my hometown before the light of Christianity came to my land.

Yes. Which gives a lie to the statement that “The people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers.”

And how can there be CHRONIC IDOLATRY in the land without that land becoming a STRONG-HOLD of demonic entities? How?

That’s a question for her and her fans. You already said there isn’t any more chronic idolatry even in your home town, so tell me how we are still being wasted by our tribal gods – even regarding African Americans in the U.S.

Every land given to idolatry becomes heavily infested with demonic presence. The idols our fore fathers worshipped were actually demon gods.

The same goes for America, Europe and Oceania. So no Westerner should reduce idolatry to Africa when it was well established in every ancient culture.

In some place, apart from tribal gods, there are also clan gods and also family gods right down to personal or individual gods. Each tribe, each clan, each family, each person have his/her own idol which represent demon gods.

Well, I don’t see them. We know people used to cleave to them, but that is no longer the case as you admitted earlier. So let’s educate ignorant non-Africans who still view us with the eyes of the past.

Did you know that Islamic insurgency played a big part in the war in Somalia which Rebecca Brown was referring to? So how is that also the work of African tribal gods when Allah had dominated the public space?

So what Rebecca said about tribal gods is true.

Not true, as I have shown. She doesn’t blame the pagan gods of Wicca, Masonry or New Age movement for violence among the white race, why did she feel convenient to do the same for Africans?

Is the Jesus that saved us different from the Jesus that saved the whites?

As I type, if you go to some parts of Nigeria now, you find tribal war going on. I heard that the Urhobos and Itshekiri don’t interact, always fighting.

And that’s somehow the fault of tribal gods? No? Could those fights be due to communal land dispute? Political clashes? Religious intolerance? Conflicting traditions? Bitter competition? Is war always monocausal and pinned to idols?

One of Nigerias biggest problem is tribalism. So what she said about tribal wars is also true.

No, you are conflating two different things. Tribalism is a real problem, but not tribal warfare.

When was the last time thousands of Igbo fought and killed thousands of Hausa? Do the Yoruba murder Fulani in wars? What about the Bini and Nupe, do you hear them chanting war songs?

We might be intolerant to a degree, but not in the way Rebecca characterizes us. White-on-white murders also occur in her America but people don’t attribute it to the clash of pagan deities. Why?

One thing we need to understand is that the idols worshipped by ancestors are demon gods and demons are not peace makers but war mongers. They can trigger war anytime, anywhere, ANYHOW.

But since we have broken with many of those idols, discarded their corpus and many of their servants have turned to the Lord Jesus, their influences (should) have diminished. Rebecca Brown is out of touch and irrational.

If the ancestors of a particular tribe have dedicated the whole tribe in their service to an idol (demon god), you can be sure that that demon has a legal right to keep operating in that tribe down the line of generation and every curse associated with that also follows.

So that’s why blacks are killing blacks in America. Very interesting. Whatever happened to redemption.

Curses are simply negative demonic effects and influences.

Agreed.

Let us put aside racial bias and be honest with our selves.

I’m afraid, that’s a message the Yoders may need to have tattooed on their foreheads.

Personally, I think the reason why the African continent is backward in terms of development and prominence has to do with the Curse Noah placed on Canaan the son of Ham.

That was what some racist western preachers said, but they are wrong. You are a well-read guy, I don’t expect you to fall for that hogwash.

We know that the Sons of Noah are the ancestor of every nation in the world today. And I believe that Africans descended from Canaan.

No. Africans have never descended from Canaan.

So it doesn’t surprise me that Africans are behind the Europeans and Asians im terms of development and advancement.

But many of the Asians are more devoted to idols than us.

Could it be that we have vision-less leaders and myopic followers? Could it be selfishness? Corruption? Faulty structures? Injustice? Please don’t let’s spiritualize what humans have caused with their own hands

Some will argue that Africans were once upon a time dominating the world. That is true. But what happen that Africa now seem to be perpetually relegated to the background?

Of course, when folks share Rebecca Brown’s unbalanced thinking that idols of centuries ago are still holding us back in spite of decades of persistent spiritual warfare, they will keep being relegated to the background.

I wonder if you are even aware of current scales of development in Rwanda, Kenya and South Africa. Their tribal gods are not strong enough, I guess.

Yes, the Europeans came and did this and that and colonised and over took. Whether what they did was good or bad, is inconsequential. What matters now is that Africa has been conquered and dominated for so long. That is the effect of a curse.

Well, African leaders are the ones conquering and dominating their own people. Mugabe and Omar Al-Bashar are two recent examples.

Since 2008, out of 13 heads of state who have died in office, 10 are Africans. Our joke of a democracy allows leaders to sit tight in office as if it’s an autocracy, loot the treasury and eventually die in a foreign hospital. But no, let’s blame those nasty curses on Ham.

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Do you mean to tell me that demons, principalities and powers do not influence the daily life and affairs of a person or group of people? Is that what you are saying?

No, that’s not what I’m saying. They influence the lives of the unsaved, but that’s not the original argument made in Rebecca’s book which is the point of dispute.

She said both Christians and non-Christians are dying in Africa because of the sins of their forefathers.

That tribal gods are wasting us because they are controlling us here and abroad. That is part of what I’m objecting to.

By the way, you can tag me in the previous posts which you want me to read. Let me read and know what misinterpreted bible verses, contradictions, fictitous claims, paranoia and demonic obssessions you are talking about. Thanks.

Here they are: one|two|three|four

The content of the first article you shared looks so familiar. I have seen it on Google search results when I was looking for Rebecca Brown’s book.

When I saw it, I thought, well, Satan is not going to sit around and do nothing against Rebecca for taking his captives.

Satan will unleash the might of his forces both humans and spirit against anyone who threatens his domain. And there are many ways he does that.

Whenever I see all such criticism against her, I recall that her books has challenged me to draw much closer to God and to be extremely serious with my relationship with God.

She challenges me to study my bible more, pray more…etc. And on that note, I mark her as a true servant of God.

What you just said now is the argument people use to protect a false teacher they have come to love and become loyal to.

If you replaced the word “Rebecca” with “Rev. King” and a host of them, nothing would change in your comment.

To those who follow Ellen White, Charles Russell, Joseph Smith or Norman Vincent Pearl, every question levied against their teachings or bad actions – no matter how rational, biblical or factual – is dismissed as an attack from Satan.

He/she has rescued captives from Satan, so the enemy stands up and uses people (including yours truly) and spirits to discredit him/her.

If this is your best answer to all that has been presented, that’s fine. But I’m highly disappointed. I thought were sharper than that.

In a way, Brown’s books helped too but that doesn’t make Rebecca a true servant of God. Why? Because even a bad person can show you the right way. Yet her books still did much damage to me.

We know of people who have been rescued from their past life of crime by Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons and even Santeria. But does that make those religious groups true? No!

I started to question her ethics when I found out that there’s nothing really new in the good she wrote. She too read Christian books and gave out what she had gleaned from them.

See, the name of Jesus will always work; the Word of God will always work even if the vessel is apostate.

Nothing Rebecca and Daniel wrote makes them “experts”. Most of their stories have been discredited biblically and factually.

If they are telling the truth, let them come out and defend themselves, but first apologize for those glaring lies and false accusations against their critics.

It’s not Satan that’s trying to stop Rebecca and Daniel Yoder. It’s Christians who want the truth and nothing but the truth who are putting off her books (even Jack Chick who worked with her did, after seeing the evidence mounting).

I pray you too realize what I did.

The biblical test that we may use to catch false teachers is clearly stated in the bible and emphasized by Rebecca Brown.

1 John 4:1, “Dear friends, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God, because many false prophets have gone out into the world.”

The sure test for any spirit or prophet is in their testimony or teaching about Jesus. If you apply the test to Jehovah’s witness, they will fail. If you apply it to RCC, they will fail. If you apply it to Santeria, Mormon etc they will all fail.

But Rebecca passes it.

Sighs. This isn’t working. This guy parrots Rebecca Brown too much to reason through this exchange.

He doesn’t realize that the “criterion” Rebecca gave was self-serving. I pointed out in one of the posts linked to above that the real test of a true spirit or prophet is the harmony of their teachings with Scripture.

He dismissed all the arguments I presented and skipped over the many problems with his hero’s life and teaching. There’s no way to go with this.

Unbroken Racism, Fanaticism and Paranoia

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Here is a feedback I received from Pillah Bee (from Kenya) on my recent Facebook post about Rebecca and Daniel Yoder:

Somebody recommended Unbroken Curses for me to read. I somehow found the writer to be biased against people of other continents, especially the blacks. How can she claim they have tribal gods in the current generation?

This is a good observation. Several reviewers of Unbroken Curses on Amazon have also pointed out that Rebecca and Daniel Yoder appeared to link other races to haunting  ancestral curses, but didn’t apply the same to their own race.

I particularly noticed a prejudicial indent in Rebecca’s first book, He Came to Set the Captives Free, where she referred to an African American couple as “Mr and Mrs Black” and “a negro couple.” She intentionally wanted her readers to know that they weren’t Mr and Mrs “white skinned.”

Considering the history of racial tensions in the American society and the Christian nature of her book, I didn’t consider it appropriate for her to append a pseudonym as “Mr and Mrs black”, or the term “negro” to persons of colour. It was unjustified in the 80s and inexcusable today.

In the Unbroken Curses (Whitaker, 1995) book, Rebecca made Africans (and by extension, African Americans) out as a violence-infested race, dying like flies today because of the influences of their tribal gods. Here is the quote:

The whole continent of Africa is characterized by tribal warfare. In 1995, there have been uprisings of intertribal warfare and massacres in Kenya as well. We have all seen the same thing in Somalia as it was filmed by the news media. The people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers. Each tribe is consequently ruled by particular demon gods. Demons hate people and are determined to exterminate them!

Thus, the whole history of Africa has been incessant warfare and massacres among tribes. Until the Christians unite as one body and cry out to God in repentance for the sins of demon worship and hatred and warfare among their tribes as well as their ancestors’ tribes, the curses from the sins of their forefathers will not be removed from their lives. Christians and non-Christians alike are being killed in those massacres. They are wasting away in the iniquities of their fathers (Leviticus 26:39).

“This same problem exists here in America. The biggest problem in any large city is gang warfare and violence. Most of this is black-on-black violence. Why? Because the intertribal warfare among blacks is being carried on right here in America. Each gang is the same as a tribe. It doesn’t matter that these precious people are no longer in Africa. They are still wasting away in the iniquities of their forefathers” (pp. 31-32).

A complete dissection of the unnerving rhetorical device employed here would require a separate post on its own, but few points are in order.

If the author(s) had a slight knowledge of the history of warfare and violence in Africa, she would have realized that Western powers are also implicated in it. Not to mention, her simplistic grasp of the causes of the massacres in Kenya and Somalia.

One only needs to read the paragraphs quoted above in light of violent occurrences in the U.S. in the past decade alone, to see how her racial prejudice negated her prescription for Africa.

I think it would be insensitive and condescending if an African writer cited the American Civil war, the Connecticut, Marysville, Roseburg and Parkland school shootings, the Orlando night club shootings and serial murders in the US and link it to European and Native American pagan gods to conclude that: “Americans are wasting away in the sins of their forefathers.”

The most irking part for me was when she wrote with dogmatic certainty that, “the people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers.”

I can only hope that this pair have met enough real African Christians since the time they wrote that hogwash to correct their misconceptions. Racial profiling is bad. It destroys social relations and fosters divisions within the Body of Christ.

A man from the UK who had read my blog articles on the Yoders, told me during a chat few weeks ago that when he read Unbroken Curses at the age of 22, he became so obsessed with demons that he was casting off demons from virtually everything. I can relate to that.

You see, the stories narrated in the book induces in an unwary reader, a neurosis of tying almost anything from a non-American or non-caucasian context with the demonic.

Few examples are in order:

(1) They narrated about a Japanese hand painted fan with the picture of a geisha girl allegedly evoking lustful thoughts in an American couple (p. 54).

We are told that geisha girls “are high-class prostitutes” and since “the painting on the fan honored and glorified geisha girls…the demon of sexual immorality had the legal right to be on the fan, which made it an unclean object” (p. 55).

From my study, geisha girls are not prostitutes, they are rather a symbol of Japanese culture.

Using Rebecca’s logic, Christians will have to be casting Buddhist and Shinto demons out from Japanese cars imported into their countries or they will come under demonic attack.

(2) Rebecca said she “fell into the trap of honouring demon gods…while visiting Hawaii for a speaking engagement” (p. 60).

She explained that when she arrived at the church the first night, two little girls placed a lei of flowers around her neck and welcomed her. Then when she began to speak, she became confused, her mind blanked out, and she couldn’t put two sentences together to make any sense.

Later, she realized that the pagans on the islands regarded the leis flowers as sacred to their gods and a sign of good luck. Thus the quirky conclusion:

I had unwittingly given honor to the demon gods of the Haiwaiin Islands when I accepted the leis around my neck! This brought me under a curse and gave the demonic spirits the legal right to attack me! (p. 61).

I must confess, that this is a twisted path. First of all, who created those plants? God. Even if some pagans sincerely believed that they were sacred to their deities, they can’t bring one under a curse or make one susceptible to demonic attack.

Apostle Paul directly addressed this: “For everything God created is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving” (1 Tim. 4:4).

Rebecca quoted this same passage when addressing unclean foods on p. 116, but she probably forgot to apply the same in this situation.

Pagans also believe roses to be sacred to their gods, but to assert that giving someone a rose flower as a gift will bring down a curse on them, is a demonic delusion in itself.

(3) A statement she made on pg. 63 would be of interest to Christian archaeologists and historians:

Thus, around the world, and on St. Croix specifically, ancient demon gods are being dug up, carefully restored, and placed in positions of honor. Money is being paid in honor as tourists go to see them. In essence, little difference exists between these tourist attractions and pagan temples.

This is a display of fanaticism. A museum is an institution that cares for a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. It’s not a pagan temple.

The ethnic images placed in museums are not for religious veneration. The money paid by tourists are not paid “in honour of demon gods.”

Various scholarly works are done by digging up such past artefacts and many of them have been useful to biblical authenticity and understanding.

The Yoders laid a burden of guilt on their Christian audience at St. Croix (and by extension, their readers):

We had to tell them that if the Christians of St. Croix do not join together to vigorously protest the [museum] project and do everything possible to stop it, then they would be guilty of sinning against God by being partakers in giving honor to demon gods...” (p. 67).

At this point, a reasonable reader should question if Rebecca and Daniel Yoder have ever vigorously protested the building of Masonic lodges, Wiccan covens, Hindu or Buddhist temples in their own state of Arkansas before asking Christians to fight against a museum project – which is a purely secular undertaking?

This is why I can’t recommend any material by this pair for new Christians. They simply capture the fevered imaginations of their own minds and syringe them into their readers.

There is a world of difference between a person enlightening you and someone filling you with hysteria.

There is a part of the book where they relayed a story about “a powerful American Indian demon god” called Tsagalalal and how she ruled over the whole region of Stevenson, Washington DC.

But when you read about this Tsagalalal from any reference work, you will realize that the Yoders exaggerated her power and influence in their book more than the Native Americans themselves.

I must also point out that the “vision” relayed by Daniel Yoder, of the rainbow bridge between heaven and earth where pets await their owners, is a variation of an American Indian myth. So much for their earlier fuss with their lei flowers.

Expectedly, on pg. 122, Rebecca exhibited her demonic paranoia towards African arts in a hotel in Abidjan:

A large, woven tapestry was hanging on the wall at the head of our bed. It had African figures woven into it. We quickly recognized that the figures were representations of demon gods. A painting of the opposite wall was a watercolor of an African tribe holding a ritual ceremony. Both were legal grounds for demons.”

Take note of two things. Once they found out an African (or non-Western) painting in the room, they instantly branded it as demonic. The silent inference is: if it isn’t Western art, it must be satanic.

Second, the figure woven into the tapestry in that hotel were plural (“representations”). Later, things went downhill:

During our stay, I developed a physical problem. I realized that I was under heavy demonic attack, but I was unable to gain victory.” (p. 123)

Now, this narrative of being defeated by demons in spite of prayer is a recurring trope in the Yoders’ books as I have pointed out. Eventually, the key to the puzzle was found when the hostess came to their room:

As soon as she looked at it [the tapestry], she said, “Oh, that is the god Poro. He is a powerful god of the tribes in northern Ivory Coast.

Earlier, we were told that there were figures woven into the tapestry, but now we are told it’s a singular figure – Poro. Rebecca further said:

Poro “hated women so much that any woman who dared to look at him or at a depiction of him immediately had a curse of death placed on her. There are no images of Poro among those northern tribes because the women who look at them die.”

If these were true, then the hotel management must have been part of a hidden conspiracy to afflict and murder foreign women by putting up a tapestry that could bring death curses on female visitors. Ah, such unbroken curses!

Let anyone reading this take a moment to do a brief Internet search about “Poro” and you will realize that it’s a male fraternal society, not a deity. Poro society is known for hunting and they are resident in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and the Ivory Coast.

The Encyclopedia of African Religion (Molefi Asante and Ama Mazama, 2008), says that “Sandogo is the women’s society, and Poro is the men’s society. Although Poro is the men’s society, young girls and post-menopausal women are permitted to join Poro, and men are permitted to join Sandogo.”

There are depictions made of Poro men and their masks, but there’s no such thing as a “powerful god of Ivory Coast” called Poro, whose hateful gaze makes women drop dead.

The argument that the hotel staff wouldn’t know her own culture as to misinform the Yoders doesn’t wash. The Yoders’ claims betray a premeditated and wilful intent to deceive their readers and sensationalize spiritual warfare.

From what I have documented so far, honesty seems to be the farthest thing from Rebecca and Daniel Yoder’s minds whenever they communicate with the public. Take their stories and visions with much caution and discretion.

I end this with the words of Pillah Bee:

That put me off. If she (or should I say they) wanted to put across their points, they need not to be biased, if their argument is valid. It is very wrong to misinform the readers especially because that’s a print media, we have people who are truly seeking to know more about biblical truths, and they need to be guided in the right direction.

Here is my exchange with a zealous fan of Rebecca Brown on this piece.

Deserved and Undeserved Curses

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Someone is bullying me for so many years, how can I curse him?” asks a man in a Facebook group dedicated to black magick.

A lady who identifies as an “Obeah queen” then replies him:

“You can bind them or you can use a black doll and put personal items from them in the doll, name the doll with their name, add cursing oils and herbs. You can then torture the doll or you can bury it in [a] cemetery.”

Some Christians – influenced by secularism and certain church traditions – will instantly dismiss this voodoo rite as a “superstitious practice from the jungles of Africa,” but an entry of the words “How to curse someone” into an online search engine indicates that such occult practices are universal.

The temple of Sulis-Minerva in Bath, England, dating back to the Roman period, has a tablet of 130 curses addressed to the goddess to avenge theft and other crimes.

These curses were written in code words spelt backwards (apparently by temple priests) and were often directed at the culprits by occult rites. In appreciation, the clients would cast their votive offerings for the goddess into the temple spring.

Michael Aquino, founder of the satanic Temple of Set, was once interviewed on Oprah and he said:
“We perform human sacrifices by proxy, you might say – the destruction of human beings who would – let’s say, create an antagonistic situation toward us – in the form of curses and hexes.”

Curses are one of the weapons agents of Satan direct against the church. A curse is an evil intention (spoken or written) effected through a demonic agency.

It’s an evil spiritual energy directed at a person through objects or rituals. Only a Christian who has his/her head in the sand bed of denial or has been hampered by ecclesiastical rigidity would reject the reality of curses. Satan’s servants don’t debate on its efficacy either.

If curses have not been working for them, they would have quit them a long time ago.

I once shared this article in a Christian group on Facebook, and a lady pleasantly commented: “I won’t believe this!” I chuckled and assured her that I didn’t post it with the intention of convincing those who have decided not to believe in curses, but to inform those who already know its reality.

When you have experienced certain things, you don’t need to read 8 books or debate with various experts for 5 hours on the subject to convince you.

So can a Christian be affected by occult curses? Yes and no.

Curses consist of demons and the Believer’s authority confers on him victory over their power. Jesus said: “I have given you authority to trample on snakes and scorpions, and to overcome all the power of the enemy; nothing will hurt you” (Lk. 10:19).

Notice that Jesus neither denied the reality of Satan nor his power but gave us authority over them. Authority (Gr. exousia) is the right to exercise power. This right can be violated.

Proverbs 26:2 says “a causeless curse shall not come.” This means some curses won’t work if they are undeserved or causeless but they will work otherwise.

When a Christian breaks his edge of spiritual protection through sin or carelessness, he will be affected by demonic attacks because the enemy now has a legal right to afflict him.

The story of Balak and Balaam in Numbers 22-24 vividly illustrates this. Balak was a Moabite king who felt his kingdom was threatened but lacked the strength to openly attack Israel. Instead he hired Balaam, a prophet, to pronounce curses on them to weaken them.

This is how occult curses work: they cause spiritual and physical weakness as well as unexplainable sickness, repeated failures, accidents, deaths or tragic circumstances etc.

Note: Balaam wasn’t a witchdoctor; he built an altar to God. He was a prophet of God but was ensnared by greed. God supernaturally intervened to hinder Balaam and when he tried to curse Israel, by turning it to blessings. Why? Because God knew the efficacy of those curses.

He didn’t ignore them as empty words or dismiss them as superstitions. Neither should we today.

Moses later referred to this event saying: “Nevertheless the Lord your God would not listen to Balaam, but the Lord your God turned the curse into a blessing for you, because the Lord your God loves you” (Dt. 23:5).

In the same vein, God in His love protects Christians from causeless curses. His protection over Israel was because

1. They were supernaturally guided day and night by a cloud and pillar of fire (symbolising the guidance of the Holy Spirit for believers today – Rom. 8:14).

2. They were walking in obedience to God’s laws.

3.  They were following God’s divine pattern for their lives (see Numbers 24:5-6). They weren’t walking in self-will and self-ambition.

In his failed attempt to curse God’s people, Balaam developed another tactic. He advised Balak to use the Moabite women to seduce the men of Israel, first into sexual immorality and, second, into idolatry (Num. 31:16). How typical.

When direct spiritual attacks fail, the enemy usually resorts to sexual seduction. If he can’t cage you directly, he lures you into a sexual sin that will make you walk directly into his snare.

Once the Israelites fell into this sinful trap, there was no need for their enemies to curse them again, because God Himself dealt harshly with them and 24,000 of them perished.

In 1 Corinthians 10:8, Christians are warned against toeing this tragic end today: “We should not commit sexual immorality, as some of them did—and in one day twenty-three thousand of them died.”

It’s self-deception for Christians living in outright disobedience to God and hostility with one another and still expect His protection from demonic weapons.

The good news however, is this: every demonic curse can be completely broken in the name and power of the Lord Jesus Christ.