Zamzam Well: Digging up Bare Bone Facts

One of the ardent readers of this blog requested that I critique Islam’s sacred well called Zamzam. I will do just that.

The Zamzam well is located within the Sacred Mosque in Mecca, about 20m east of the Kaaba (the black stone Muslims dance around and kiss). Millions of pilgrims visit Zamzam well to drink its water during the pilgrimage. The Quran says nothing about the well – pointing to the fact that it wasn’t part of the rites observed by early Muslims.

In the Hadiths collected 250 years after the Quran, we are told that when Hagar and Ishmael were in the desert and Ishmael was thirsty, he scraped the sand and water was generated from that point. So, the hadith is saying the wild kicks of an infant dug a 98 ft well in a desert within seconds! Another version of the story says the well was dug by an angel’s foot. In another version, the angel dug it using his wings. [1]

In a bid to redact the Biblical account of Hagar and Ishmael to support Islam’s myths, the hadith ends up nailing itself. One, Abraham, Ishmael and Hagar were never in Mecca and historically have no link with Zamzam well. Two, it’s incredulous to accept that an oasis morphed into a deep well without changing its course or affected by climatic factors for over a millennia.

Some historians point out that Mecca probably didn’t exist as a city before 4 BC when Yemenite immigrants colonized it. There’s no way Zamzam well would date back to the time of Abraham. To make the myth more appealing, Ibn Abbas ostensibly quotes Muhammad saying: “The best water on the face of the earth is Zamzam. In it is food for nourishment and healing for illness.” [2]

In 2011, a team of scientists established that the water from Zamzam well contained high levels of nitrate, potentially harmful bacteria and arsenic at levels 3 times the legal limit in the UK. This could result in cancer. [3] This research blew the prayer caps off the heads of the clerics in Saudi Arabia. Eventually, they managed to find their own “scientists” to tell them what their ears of faith wanted to hear.

From the earliest biography of Muhammad, the truth about Zamzam unfolds. Muhammad’s grandfather, Abdul Muttalib, was said to have had a dream while sleeping in a ‘sacred’ enclosure in which he was instructed to dig a well at a slaughter place of the Quraish tribe, between two idols – Isaf and Naila. In the dream, he was told to re-dig a Zamzam well which the Jurham tribe had filled up when they left Mecca.

When Abdul Muttalib embarked on his well project, he faced much opposition. He even vowed to sacrifice his son if he succeeded and the divination lot alarmingly fell on his favourite son, Abdullah (Muhammad’s father). But after consulting a sorceress, he was told to sacrifice camels to Allah/Hubal in place of his son, Abdullah. The Zamzam well became a religious site drawing more pilgrims to the Kaaba. [4] Indeed, the Zamzam well was part of pre-Islamic pagan rites and was dedicated to two deities – Isaf and Naila.

Arab scholar, Fahd T., says that Isaf and Naila were “a pair of gods worshipped at Mecca before Islam. Several orientalists of the past century … saw in them, not unreasonably, replicas of Baal and Baalat. Indeed Isaf and Naila do display the essential characteristics distinguishing this pair of gods from the many avatars known in the various Semitic religions: physical representations by two sacred stones erected close to each other, or by two parallel hills…” [5] It’s possible that the same fertility deities of the Zamzam well were also represented by Safa and Marwa – the two “sacred” hills Muslims run through during the hajj.

During pre-Islamic days, many pagans came to Mecca for pilgrimage. The Kaaba shrine at the time had about 360 idols whose names the pilgrims (who were often stark naked) would chant as they circulate the stone. Although Muhammad threw away the images of the idols and stopped the nude aspect of the rite when he took over the Kaaba, he retained most of the pagan rituals. Today, Muslim pilgrims wear the Ihram clothing as they ignorantly offer worship to ancient Arabian pagan deities (now disguised as “monotheism”).

An Indian author even asserts that from certain similarities, the Kaaba was originally a temple of Shiva. He says that “the Shankara stone which Muslim pilgrims reverently touch and kiss in the Kaaba” is an emblem of Shiva and “wherever the Shiva emblem is, the Ganges must co-exist. True to this association, a sacred fountain [Zamzam] exists near the Kaaba.” [6]

While this claim may be farfetched, in any case, there’s nothing ‘sacred’ about the Zamzam well anymore than the black stone idol.

NOTES

1. Sahih Bukhari, 3113

2. Mu’jam Al-Kabeer, 11011.

3. BBC News May, 5, 2011.

4. Sirat Rasul Allah, translated by Alfred Guillaume, The Life of Muhammad, 1955, 66-68.

5. Encyclopedia of Islam, second edition. Available online.

6. Purushottam Oak, Was Kaaba a Hindu Temple?

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Destructive Pacts and their Outworkings

As God was sending His people into the lands of the Canaanites who were involved in pagan worship, He warned them: “Do not make a covenant with them or their gods” (Ex. 23:32). God was warning them against entering into covenants with evil spirits. Some of them eventually “joined” themselves with pagan gods such as Baal (Num. 25:3, Ps. 106:28; Hos. 4:17). This “joining” implies a covenant.

A covenant is a binding agreement between two or more people or parties to get things done with penalty by contact or sacrifice. It’s also called a contract or pact. In The Mummy (2017) movie, Ahmanet, an Egyptian princess is shown making a pact with the Egyptian god of evil, Seth, to help her murder her rivals. In return she was to invoke him into a human body. This illustrates occult pacts between a person and a demon or deity.

A common pact is that made with elemental spirits. These are evil spirits associated with the four elements – air, water, earth and fire. Each class of spirits has identifiable rituals, symbols and operations. These “fantastic four” are also deployed in cinematic characters and storylines. In the Moana movie for instance, the 4 elements – including the fifth one (the spirit force) – all worked together. The green “heart of goddess Te Fiti” is actually a Bezoar stone (or Mustika pearl) used by real life witches and New Agers to communicate with elemental spirits.

Enya’s songs, obviously tailored for New Age listeners, make references to these elemental forces. Part of the lyrics of O Miraculum says in English:

To set sail, a wonderful thing
Wayfarers see the sky, the oceans and the earth
The sea, the sea under the evening star

In her Latin song, Tempus Vernum, she says:

Behold, the north, the south
Behold, the west and the east
Behold, the ocean, the sea …
Behold the earth, the star, the winter and the summer…
Behold the ray of the sun and the shadow, the fire, the water, the sky, the moon, the earth, the star

In the occult, these 4 elemental spirits are linked to the four cardinal points: water (West), fire (East), air (North) and earth (South). In many Wiccan traditions, the four seasons of the Western hemisphere and four other sun-oriented dates are called “sabbaths.” During these 8 sabbaths, their Horned god is ritually invoked into a male witch. [1]

In La Sonadora, her lyrics in English say:

I; the autumn
I; the evening star
I have been an echo
I shall be a wave
I shall be the moon
I have been everything
I am myself

The two elements mentioned here are air (echo) and water (wave). The “evening star” is a title of the pagan great Goddess Ishtar, Astarte or Venus. These goddess forms are also associated with the moon and often invoked on nights of the full moon (esbats) through a Wiccan ritual called “Drawing down the moon.” [2] Fittingly, the CD of this music album, The Memory of Trees, has the picture of a full moon surmounted over Enya,

In Orinoco Flow, Enya focuses on the water element:

From Peru to Cebu hear the power of Babylon
From Bali to Cali far beneath the coral sea
From the deep sea of clouds
To the island of the moon
Carry me on the waves
To the lands I’ve never been

This is a poetic invocation of water spirits to transport the listener to their realm. This is a spiritual kingdom of a hierarchy of demons. One of their key rulers is called “Queen of the coast” (or Queen of the river). She and the many demons under command wield control over many nations, families and individuals through fashion, music, aesthetics, inventions, finance, religions, sexual immorality and entertainment.

There is hardly a culture that does not acknowledge the existence of spiritual entities within water bodies, although many in ignorance and delusion worship them. In the Bible, apostate Jews worshipped a goddess named Asherah. The Bible mentions her images (1 Kg. 15:13), her prophets (1 Kg. 18:19) and the vessels used in her service (2 Kg. 23:4). “In the Ras Shamrah texts, Asherah is the consort of El, the supreme god. She is mentioned as ‘creatress of the gods’ and ‘Lady Asherah of the sea,’ titles that are given to the most important goddess of the pantheon.” [3]

The name of this demonic queen varies from place to place; some even call her “Our Lady of Regla.” Latino music star, Celia Cruz, dedicated an entire track to her in Spanish:

Virgin of Rule, today is your day
Mother of water, my goddess Yemaya
You are the Queen
These songs that we give you o mother
Yemaya my mother, my mother
Ohhoho live Yemaya! [4]

In the first scene of Beyoncé’s Drunk in Love video, there was an eerie music with a focus on the image of a queen on a trophy borne by Beyoncé. She wears a pendant of an inverted triangle/pyramid in this scene. This is a witchcraft symbol of the water element. In February 2017, she released a poem for her twins, part of which says:

Mother has one foot in this world
One foot in the next
Mother black Venus in the dream
I am crowning Osun, Nefertiti and Yemoja
Pray around my bed
I can smell jasmine
I wake up as someone places a wreath upon my head

Osun and Yemoja are Yoruba names for the Queen of the river – believed to be “patron” of sexual lust, childbirth and divination. In witchcraft, Jasmine incense is used for rites involving lust, protection, dreams and money. Nefertiti was an Egyptian consort of Pharaoh Akhenaten who extensively worshipped the solar disk. It’s not a coincidence that this poem was released on February 2, Yemoja’s feast day.

Nigerian music star, Victor Uwaifo, talked about his encounter with this demon:

“That particular day, I stayed really late till everybody had gone. Not long after, I observed that each time the waves advances towards me, I would move back, but the farther I moved the closer it came. Suddenly, I observed a figure coming towards me. I wanted to move away. I screamed … She said “If you see mammy water [Yemoja], never you run away.” I just thought the mermaid loved the music, otherwise it would have harmed me.”

He composed a song based on her words and it became an instant hit. When the interviewer asked if there’s a link between this encounter and his subsequent success, he answered, “I call it esoteric, a privileged knowledge not for everybody. From that time till today, I have been very privileged. I am a spiritual person, I have a chapel in my house.” [5]

Demons don’t just physically appear to people. Some evil covenants must have been in place. Many people consciously enter into these pacts for fame, wealth, success and supernatural abilities e.g water witching, breathing under water, healing etc. Others unconsciously enter into them by offering sacrifices at streams/rivers or lakes, ritual baths, consulting water priests/priestesses, sexual contacts with agents, use of paraphernalia and items dedicated to water spirits and participating in their festivals.

The annual Osun festival held in Osogbo, Osun State, is an instantiation of demon worship under the toga of “African tradition.” Every year, many religious tourists and devotees from within and outside the country troop to the Osun grove (which by the way, is registered with UNESCO) to make and renew their covenants with the Queen of the river.

One of these pilgrims said:
“I was married for over 10 years without the fruit of the womb and the pressure was becoming unbearable from my in-laws … I came to this river in tears and barely one year later, I was all smiles. The river goddess heard my cries and gave me a bouncing baby boy … I go to church but I remain grateful for what the river goddess has done for me.” [6]

Sadly, there are many “Christians” like this woman who “worshiped the LORD, but … also served their own gods” (2 Kgs. 17:33). They profess to follow the Lamb, but swear allegiance to the dragon. These water entities are monstrous beings that seduce and devour their preys like their master Satan (Is. 27:1). The devil and his imps do offer people beggarly fame, comfort and power for pacts, but they all end here on earth.

In contrast, God enters into a covenant with as many accept Jesus as their Lord and Saviour and offers them every spiritual blessings in heavenly places and all that pertains to life and godliness by His divine power (Eph. 2:1; 2 Pet. 2:3) – only asking that we love, follow, serve and obey Him with all our hearts.

Notes

1. William Schnoebelen, Wicca: Satan’s Little White Lie, Chick Pub., 1990, 223
2. Margot Adler, Drawing Down the Moon, Penguin Books, 1986, 20
3. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. Geoffrey Bromiley, 1979, Vol. 1 p. 317
4. Slightly re-arranged and translated using Google Translate.
5. Nigerian Entertainment Today, July 11, 2014.
6. Osun Osogbo: A Communion of Spirits, Mortals https://emekaumejei.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/osun-osogbo-communion-of-spirits-mortals/