Unbroken Racism, Fanaticism and Paranoia

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Here is a feedback I received from Pillah Bee (from Kenya) on my recent Facebook post about Rebecca and Daniel Yoder:

Somebody recommended Unbroken Curses for me to read. I somehow found the writer to be biased against people of other continents, especially the blacks. How can she claim they have tribal gods in the current generation?

This is a good observation. Several reviewers of Unbroken Curses on Amazon have also pointed out that Rebecca and Daniel Yoder appeared to link other races to haunting  ancestral curses, but didn’t apply the same to their own race.

I particularly noticed a prejudicial indent in Rebecca’s first book, He Came to Set the Captives Free, where she referred to an African American couple as “Mr and Mrs Black” and “a negro couple.” She intentionally wanted her readers to know that they weren’t Mr and Mrs “white skinned.”

Considering the history of racial tensions in the American society and the Christian nature of her book, I didn’t consider it appropriate for her to append a pseudonym as “Mr and Mrs black”, or the term “negro” to persons of colour. It was unjustified in the 80s and inexcusable today.

In the Unbroken Curses (Whitaker, 1995) book, Rebecca made Africans (and by extension, African Americans) out as a violence-infested race, dying like flies today because of the influences of their tribal gods. Here is the quote:

The whole continent of Africa is characterized by tribal warfare. In 1995, there have been uprisings of intertribal warfare and massacres in Kenya as well. We have all seen the same thing in Somalia as it was filmed by the news media. The people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers. Each tribe is consequently ruled by particular demon gods. Demons hate people and are determined to exterminate them!

Thus, the whole history of Africa has been incessant warfare and massacres among tribes. Until the Christians unite as one body and cry out to God in repentance for the sins of demon worship and hatred and warfare among their tribes as well as their ancestors’ tribes, the curses from the sins of their forefathers will not be removed from their lives. Christians and non-Christians alike are being killed in those massacres. They are wasting away in the iniquities of their fathers (Leviticus 26:39).

“This same problem exists here in America. The biggest problem in any large city is gang warfare and violence. Most of this is black-on-black violence. Why? Because the intertribal warfare among blacks is being carried on right here in America. Each gang is the same as a tribe. It doesn’t matter that these precious people are no longer in Africa. They are still wasting away in the iniquities of their forefathers” (pp. 31-32).

A complete dissection of the unnerving rhetorical device employed here would require a separate post on its own, but few points are in order.

If the author(s) had a slight knowledge of the history of warfare and violence in Africa, she would have realized that Western powers are also implicated in it. Not to mention, her simplistic grasp of the causes of the massacres in Kenya and Somalia.

One only needs to read the paragraphs quoted above in light of violent occurrences in the U.S. (and Europe) in the past decade alone, to see how her racial prejudice negated her prescription for Africa.

Imagine how insensitive and condescending it would sound for an African writer to cite the American Civil war, the Connecticut, Marysville, Roseburg and Parkland school shootings, several workplace shootings, the Orlando night club shootings and serial murders in the US and link it to the pagan gods of Masonry, New Age ashrams and Neo-Nazi gangs in America, and then conclude that “Americans are wasting away in the sins of their forefathers.”

The most irking part for me was when she wrote with dogmatic certainty that, “the people of Africa have never broken away from the sins of their forefathers.”

I can only hope that this pair have met enough real African Christians since the time they wrote that hogwash to correct their misconceptions. Racial profiling is bad. It destroys social relations and fosters divisions within the Body of Christ.

A man from the UK who had read my blog articles on the Yoders, told me during a chat few weeks ago that when he read Unbroken Curses at the age of 22, he became so obsessed with demons that he was casting off demons from virtually everything. I can relate to that.

You see, the case histories given in the book tend to induce in an unwary reader, a neurosis of tying almost anything from a non-American or non-caucasian context with the demonic.

Few examples are in order:

(1) They narrated about a Japanese hand painted fan with the picture of a geisha girl allegedly evoking lustful thoughts in an American couple (p. 54).

We are told that geisha girls “are high-class prostitutes” and since “the painting on the fan honored and glorified geisha girls…the demon of sexual immorality had the legal right to be on the fan, which made it an unclean object” (p. 55).

From my study, geisha girls are not prostitutes, they are rather a symbol of Japanese culture.

Using Rebecca’s logic, Christians will have to be casting Buddhist and Shinto demons out from Japanese cars imported into their countries or they will come under demonic attack.

(2) Rebecca said she “fell into the trap of honouring demon gods…while visiting Hawaii for a speaking engagement” (p. 60).

She explained that when she arrived at the church the first night, two little girls placed a lei of flowers around her neck and welcomed her. Then when she began to speak, she became confused, her mind blanked out, and she couldn’t put two sentences together to make any sense.

Later, she realized that the pagans on the islands regarded the leis flowers as sacred to their gods and a sign of good luck. Thus the quirky conclusion:

I had unwittingly given honor to the demon gods of the Haiwaiin Islands when I accepted the leis around my neck! This brought me under a curse and gave the demonic spirits the legal right to attack me! (p. 61).

I must confess, that this is a twisted, tortured path. First of all, who created those plants? God. So even if some pagans sincerely believed that they were sacred to their deities, they can’t bring one under a curse or make one susceptible to demonic attack.

Apostle Paul directly addressed this: “For everything God created is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving” (1 Tim. 4:4).

Rebecca quoted this same passage when addressing unclean foods on p. 116, but she probably forgot to apply the same in this situation.

Pagans also believe roses to be sacred to their gods, but to assert that giving someone a rose flower as a gift will bring down a curse on them, is a demonic delusion in itself.

(3) A statement she made on pg. 63 would be of interest to Christian archaeologists and historians:

Thus, around the world, and on St. Croix specifically, ancient demon gods are being dug up, carefully restored, and placed in positions of honor. Money is being paid in honor as tourists go to see them. In essence, little difference exists between these tourist attractions and pagan temples.

This is a display of fanaticism. A museum is an institution that cares for a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. It’s not a pagan temple.

The ethnic images placed in museums are not for religious veneration. The money paid by tourists are not paid “in honour of demon gods.” Various scholarly works are done by digging up such past artefacts and many of them have been useful to biblical authenticity and understanding.

The Yoders laid a burden of guilt on their Christian audience at St. Croix (and by extension, their readers):

We had to tell them that if the Christians of St. Croix do not join together to vigorously protest the [museum] project and do everything possible to stop it, then they would be guilty of sinning against God by being partakers in giving honor to demon gods...” (p. 67).

At this point, a reasonable reader should question if Rebecca and Daniel Yoder have ever vigorously protested the building of Masonic lodges, Wiccan covens, Hindu or Buddhist temples in their own state of Arkansas before asking Christians to fight against a museum project – which is a purely secular undertaking?

This is why I can’t recommend any material by this pair for new Christians. They simply capture the fevered imaginations of their own minds and syringe them into their readers.

There is a world of difference between a person enlightening you and someone filling you with hysteria.

There is a part of the book where they relayed a story about “a powerful American Indian demon god” called Tsagalalal and how she ruled over the whole region of Stevenson, Washington DC.

But when you read about this Tsagalalal from any reference work, you will realize that the Yoders exaggerated her power and influence in their book more than the Native Americans themselves.

I must also point out that the “vision” relayed by Daniel Yoder, of the rainbow bridge between heaven and earth where pets await their owners, is a variation of an American Indian myth. So much for their earlier fuss with their lei flowers.

Expectedly, on pg. 122, Rebecca exhibited her demonic paranoia towards African arts in a hotel in Abidjan:

A large, woven tapestry was hanging on the wall at the head of our bed. It had African figures woven into it. We quickly recognized that the figures were representations of demon gods. A painting of the opposite wall was a watercolor of an African tribe holding a ritual ceremony. Both were legal grounds for demons.”

Take note of two things. Once they found out an African (or non-Western) painting in the room, they instantly brand it as demonic. And the figure woven into the tapestry in that hotel were plural.

Later, things went downhill:

During our stay, I developed a physical problem. I realized that I was under heavy demonic attack, but I was unable to gain victory.” (p. 123)

Now, this narrative of being defeated by demons in spite of prayer is a recurring trope in the Yoders’ books as I have pointed out. Eventually, the key to the puzzle was found when the hostess came to their room:

As soon as she looked at it [the tapestry], she said, “Oh, that is the god Poro. He is a powerful god of the tribes in northern Ivory Coast.

Earlier, we were told that there were figures woven into the tapestry, but now we are told it’s a singular figure – Poro. Rebecca further said:

Poro “hated women so much that any woman who dared to look at him or at a depiction of him immediately had a curse of death placed on her. There are no images of Poro among those northern tribes because the women who look at them die.”

If these were true, then the hotel management must have been part of a hidden conspiracy to afflict and kill foreign women by putting up a tapestry that could bring death curses on female visitors. Ah, such unbroken curses!

Let anyone reading this take a moment to do a brief Internet search about “Poro” and you will realize that it’s a male fraternal society, not a deity. Poro society is known for hunting and they are resident in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and the Ivory Coast.

The Encyclopedia of African Religion (Molefi Asante and Ama Mazama, 2008), says that “Sandogo is the women’s society, and Poro is the men’s society. Although Poro is the men’s society, young girls and post-menopausal women are permitted to join Poro, and men are permitted to join Sandogo.”

There are depictions made of Poro men and their masks, but there’s no such thing as a “powerful god of Ivory Coast” called Poro, whose hateful gaze makes women drop dead.

The argument that the hotel staff wouldn’t know her own culture as to misinform the Yoders doesn’t wash. The Yoders’ claims betray a premeditated and wilful intent to deceive people and sensationalize spiritual warfare.

From what I have documented so far, honesty seems to be the farthest thing from Rebecca and Daniel Yoder’s minds whenever they communicate with the public. Take their stories and visions with much caution and discretion.

I end this with the words of Pillah Bee:

That put me off. If she (or should I say they) wanted to put across their points, they need not to be biased, if their argument is valid. It is very wrong to misinform the readers especially because that’s a print media, we have people who are truly seeking to know more about biblical truths, and they need to be guided in the right direction.

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Christianity and Iconoclasm

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The parishioners of St. Jacob’s Catholic church, Enugu, were shocked beyond words in January 2019 when a woman went to their Marian grotto on a Sunday morning, doused their statue with fuel and set it ablaze.

Conversely, in several parts of Southern Nigeria, it’s not uncommon for mobs of zealous Christians to seek out pagan shrines, burn them to the ground and destroy their idols.

The same trend is reported in other countries where Christians vandalize Buddhist or Hindu temples, decapitating their images and spray-painting words like “Jesus is the only true God” on their walls.

Many of these Christians fondly see themselves as warriors defending the faith, and would identify themselves as iconoclasts.

The term iconoclasm comes from the word icon (from the Greek eikon, “to resemble”), signifying a religious picture or image, and klan (Gk., meaning “to break”). Hence, an iconoclast was one who advocated the destruction of images.

From history, the use and adoration of images in the church began toward the end of the third century. This was a common practice in the Eastern branch of the church due to the influence of heathen worship (E. H. Klotsche, The History of Christian Doctrine, Grand Rapids, 1979, p. 118).

This trend spread to the West and continued until 726 A.D. when Emperor Leo III issued an edict forbidding the use of images in the church and commanding them to be destroyed. This resulted in the Byzantine iconoclastic movement provoking riots, persecution and destruction of entire monasteries.

Even though some Catholics were also opposed to image worship, the practice began to gain impetus at the Second Council of Nicea of 784.

During the 16th century Reformation, Calvinists led waves of iconoclasm which swept through many Protestant cities and territories in Europe:

“The destruction was radical, but orderly. It was effected by the co-operation of the preachers and the civil magistracy, with the consent of the people. It began at Pentecost, and was completed June 1524 … the churches of the city were purged of pictures, relics, crucifixes, altars, candles, and all ornaments … The Swiss iconoclasm passed into the Reformed Churches of France, Holland, Scotland, and North America” (Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, VIII ch. 3, S. 19).

This, of course provoked riots from the people, including Lutherans, who favoured such religious arts in their churches and homes.

Other instances of iconoclasm also occurred in several parts of Africa and Polynesia during the colonial era, between the 19th-20th century. Though, the extent of aggression or cooperation involved in these movements is quite debatable.

Those in the West where religions enjoy legal protection, would find it puzzling that someone would have such fanatical zeal to destroy the objects of worship of marginal religions.

But for many of us raised in cultures that were steeped in paganism, the constant tension between indigenous religions and a more civilized religion/faith is an extant reality.

On the one hand, the Christian seeks to eschew idolatry and on the other, in his fervour to please God, he feels the need to obliterate what is detestable in His sight.

How one can balance both levers without falling into the ditch on either side needs to be vigorously discussed in the church, otherwise, we can negate our message with certain actions and stir up bitter hostility where there ought to be none.

Here’s the lingering question: is it biblically and logically right for a Christian today to carry out mass destruction of physical images and structures of other religions?

1. The motive behind every iconoclasm should be weighed. To be sure, iconoclasm has also been (even more) executed by non-Christian religions.

(a) In ancient Egypt, Akhenaten instituted a state monolatristic tradition focused on the god Aten, the solar disk. So he sent his officials to destroy temples and monuments and chisel out every reference to Amun and the names of other deities besides Aten on tombs, temples and cartouches.

(b) When Muhammad and his armies captured Mecca, they destroyed the physical images of all the deities in the Kaaba, though retaining some of their rituals.

Later in the 8th century, the Edict of Yazid ordered the destruction of crosses and Christian images within the caliphate. Islamic conquests also executed iconoclastic agenda against Hinduism, Buddhism, Egyptian religions and the Shi’ite sect. Up till today, historic sites and minority religious structures are being destroyed in Islamic climes.

(c) During the French Revolution, numerous monuments, religious works and other historically significant pieces were destroyed in an attempt to wipe out the memories of the Old Regime.

(d) During the Chinese Tang dynasty and Xinhai Revolution, there was widespread destruction of Buddhist temples, images as well as historical artwork – whether secular or religious. The same occurred during the Northern Expedition in Guangxi in 1926 and the Cultural Revolution led by Mao Zedong.

Iconoclasm in these instances was about power – one side with dominant political power seeking to establish itself by eradicating others. Iconoclasm can have purely political, expansionist and triumphalist motives.

2. Granted, God commanded the Jews to “destroy their altars … break down their sacred pillars… cut down their wooden images” (Dt. 7:5), “burn the carved images of their gods” (Dt. 7:25).

However, these were directed at the pagan nations inhabiting the Promised Land which God had given to the Israelites. They only carried out iconoclasm on specific pagan nations as God directly commanded them.

These iconoclastic commands have not been given to any other nation since then, and it can’t be properly applied to the Church – since it’s worldwide and doesn’t have an earthly Promised Land. Thus, those passages have limited application.

3. When Israel became an identifiable nation with God-chosen Judges, Kings and Prophets, national repentance was often signified by collective destruction of pagan artefacts, altars and shrines and renunciation of pagan worship (e.g 2 Kgs. 10:27-28; 2 Chr. 17:5-6).

These were purgings initiated by converted hearts, even if mediated by monarchial or prophetic orders. An analogy can be drawn from these today when a community forsakes their idols and turn to the Living God.

This is by far the most legitimate expression of iconoclasm. This occurred during the 20th century revivals held by Apostle Joseph Babalola in the South West.

4. Christian iconoclasm, however, can have a boomerang effect if it’s ignited by legalistic and totalitarian objectives. It can have both good and bad outcomes.

Let’s take the Protestant Reformation as an example. Though Calvin himself did not support iconoclastic violence, many of his associates and followers did.

In Switzerland, in the Rhenish and Netherlandish territories, and in England, 16th century Calvinists defaced, destroyed, and confiscated a great many works of art, paintings, sculpure, stained-glass windows, ecclesiastical furnishings and whole buildings.

Libraries were burned, pianos were removed, tapestry and other ornaments were sold or given away. Though their intentions were to purify Christendom, their methods were extreme and severe. Eventually, it didn’t fare too well.

When iconoclasm is animated by legalistic impulses, what qualifies as “sacred” and “abominable” is often subject to the view of the iconoclast.

For instance, some Christians believe jewelleries, hair extensions, make-up, body ornaments and even statues or paintings of animals like frogs, fishes and fishes are demonic and detestable before God. If they should carry out a mass purging of a city they deem to be ungodly, all these materials will fall under their destruction category.

Such a move may be touted as a discontinuity with the past, but it can actually revive a need for continuity with the old trends. This is a consequence of imposing true worship with the arm of the flesh.

5. In addressing iconoclasm, we also need to understand that idolatry is nuanced and complex. It is more than just physical images. It has spiritual, mental and psychological hold on people.

Spiritual, in the sense that whenever people make an idol – whether with wood, clay, bronze or gold – and gather to worship it, some evil spirits are assigned by Satan there to hover around the shrine and influence the lives of those worshippers. They can also speak through the priests and priestesses to the adherents and from there, rites of worship develop.

Mental, in the sense that an idol is often a representation of a god or gods conceived by the mind of man. So an idol may not necessarily be a physical image or representation. A person can have an imagination or false conception of God (or a god) and direct his worship toward that false god. It’s still idolatry, but a mental one.

Psychologically, most idolaters make physical images from the archetypes embedded within their psyche. No Catholic has seen the actual Mary before. No Hindu has seen Vishnu either. But they attach that name to whatever image has been made with human hands and infuse it with certain features and attributes which they desire in themselves or seek to banish.

Therefore, merely destroying physical images of idols or pagan deities doesn’t solve the problem. The worshipper can simply pick up the same idol in another form.

This is obviously why God didn’t command Christians to go from house to house destroying people’s physical idols in the New Testament like it was done in the OT.

The reason is simple: it would be a useless exercise if the spirits behind those idols are still influencing the people and those image archetypes still exist in their minds.

6. Indeed, some Christians have shared genuine experiences where they were led by the Holy Spirit to engage in spiritual warfare prayers and some pagan idols or altars were supernaturally destroyed.

While I do not discredit such experiences, I will say that these are exceptional cases.

I know that many Christians involved in “spiritual mapping” and territorial warfare prayers visit shrines or temples and pray against the idols there, with the intent that the ruling demon would lose its hold and the worshippers will be saved.

Some Christians even proceed to deface and wreck religious artefacts, like the examples given at the outset, drawing on the example of Gideon in the OT.

My take is, unless God specifically directs you to go on such an assignment, you are skating on thin ice. One, because you can’t successfully fight a battle that our Captain (Jesus) hasn’t authorized you to fight.

Two, you can’t expel an evil spirit from its residence unless its legal right to rule has been revoked. As long as its altars, images, emblems and the shrines are there, the demon still has the right to reign there.

Three, having studied the book of Acts over and over, I can’t find a place where the apostles or early Christians (who lived in pagan cultures) were praying against the spirits of Zeus, Mars, Artemis, or Castor and Pollux or destroying their images and temples so that pagans would massively come to Christ.

Instead, they went about preaching the Gospel by the power of the Holy Spirit and many were saved. That’s the power of God’s Word. When the people were truly converted by the Holy Spirit, they gathered their own occult books and burnt them in public (Acts 19: 19).

7. The Bible says, “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ” (2 Cor. 10:5)

In other words, our battle is not really against physical structures or images and it shouldn’t be fought with physical weapons.

Therefore, as true Christian iconoclasts, we are to demolish arguments and imaginations that fuel false worship and bring down false ideas, philosophies and imagery that enslave people to them.

When those freed now decide to physically destroy their objects of false worship, we know the victory won in the spirit has been sealed in the physical.

Enya: The Occult Connection

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From day to day, my journey,

The long pilgrimage before me.

From night to night, my journey,

The stories that will never be again

The above lyric is the English translation of the part of Enya’s Book of Days sung in Irish Gaelic.

The first time I heard this song on TV in 2004, even though I was a Christian, it resonated deeply with my sense of aesthetics. Four years later when a Christian friend introduced me to his Enya collection, I dived into them like an excited dolphin. I couldn’t get enough of her music.

Sometimes when I listened to Orinoco Flow, I felt a strange sensation in my spirit, like I was immersed in a body of water.

From experience, I knew what that implied, and I began to check out her lyrics. Right from the first one I read, I could figure out the deep witchcraft codes embedded in them and I made a clean break.

Enya Patricia Brennan is more than just an Irish singer and songwriter born into a musical family. To unwary Christians, Enya’s music is a potpourri of classical, church and folk music with poetic, nostalgic and calming sensations.

To the uninformed, Enya is simply a liberal Irish Catholic who, at most, beautifies her faith with mysticism. But to the discerning, she is on a journey; a long pilgrimage on the Old Ways: witchcraft.

In this article, which is a sequel to the one I wrote four years ago, I will be unraveling more occult connections in Enya’s music, showing that those who identify her as a New Age/occult singer, are not mistaken by any means.

According to a reference work, New Age music emerged in the midst of “the advent of all manner of self-awareness and higher-consciousness trends and fads floating about in the 1970s, and the increasing popularity of non-traditional ideas regarding health and well being.” [1]

New Age stores not only also sell occult books, ‘healing crystals’ and pagan artifacts, but also New Age music – relaxing music that serve as aural companions for whatever occult technique the customer is seeking. It all fits together.

In occult circles, guided meditation is often practiced, in which the practitioner connects with the spirit realm and the spirits therein through the aid of mantra, occult music or drugs.

This occult meditation is aimed at different purposes: relaxation, for pagan breathing exercises, inducing trances, healing and preparation for spell work and witchcraft.

The relaxing music is aimed at fostering mental passivity and mind control which are necessary conditions to get yoked to the demonic realm.

During a spell work, a witch/magick practitioner must be able to use his/her mind to visualize and direct his/her psychic powers to its destination. Thus, they need pagan/occult-themed music to stimulate their minds.

Such music genre could be classical, jazz, or ethnic (such as Celtic), but they are music composed by the initiated and for the initiated. One occult organization even described them as “music of the spheres.” Indeed, the spheres of darkness.

A few examples of such music are Ave Maria by Origen, Mystic Spirit Voices by Lesiem, A Place Without Noise by Wayne Gratz, a number of Yanni’s music and of course, Enya.

Many of Enya’s song weren’t relayed in English language. She also employed back masking so folks who don’t know about the occult wouldn’t notice that she was onto something sinister.

1. Afer Ventus (English translation: African wind) says:

Sea of the Clouds, Umbriel

(Each to their own. Each to it’s own)

Sea of the Rain. Ariel

(Me, myself. Each to their own is dear)

And we go to the stars …

Sea of the Tides. Io. Vela

African wind. Zephyrus

(Each to their own. Each to its own)

Volturnus. Africus…

Estesiarum. Eurus.

(Me, myself. Each to their own is dear).

Umbriel and Ariel, though names for moons of Uranus, actually refer to specific demons. Umbriel is an earth demon often depicted with black wings, while Ariel is a demon of the air.

In Satanism, Ariel is a fallen angel called the “archon of wings” and is said to connect the adept to other elemental spirits.

Io is the name of a female water spirit worshipped in ancient Rome [2]. It’s no accident that Enya says that she moves with the tides of the sea.

Vela is the name of a constellation. It also means “sails (of a ship)” in Latin. Vela represents the sails of the Argo Navis ship which was constructed by the goddess Athena and consecrated to the Roman sea god, Poseidon. [3]

Zephyrus is the Greek deity of the west wind. He has strong ties to Zepar, another deadly demon that is invoked in Satanism, especially by men who seek to bring women under the slave of lust.

Volturnus is the Roman god of the Tibre and is probably regarded as the god of all rivers. He also belongs to the class of Anemoi and is equivalent to the southeast wind. [4]

Africus is the Greek deity of the southwest wind. Estesiarum is a term describing the north winds of the Aegean Sea and Eurus is the Greek deity of the East wind.

So, in this music alone, Enya invokes several “big guns” to take over the listener.

2. Exile (chorus)

I’ll wait the signs to come.

I will find a way

I will wait the time to come.

I’ll find a way home

My light shall be the moon

And my path – the ocean.

My guide the morning star

As I said home to you

Who then can warm my soul?

Who can quell my passion?

Out of these dreams – a boat

I will sail home to you.

You will notice that Enya keeps singing about being on a “path” or “journey.” Modern Witches believe their religion is the old path; and right from their initiation, each step taken upon this path leads towards a greater understanding of the natural world and the divinity that purportedly lives within them.

In witchcraft, the moon, through its phases and faces, is said to guide witches through the mysteries of life. It regulates nature and magick, and when they draw down the moon at their esbats, they are tapping into the pure white mystical light of the moon.

The “morning star” or “torch bearer” epithet is used for their goddess Hecate, Diana/Artemis, and in the Bible, it refers to Lucifer/Satan (Is. 14:12). So, the message Enya was conveying there is loud and clear.

3. Angeles

Angels answer me, are you near if rain should fall? Am I to believe, you will rise to calm the storm?

For so great a treasure words will never do. Surely, if this is, promises are mine to give you

Mine to give you …

Angeles, all could be

Should you move both earth and sea

Angeles, I could feel all those dark clouds disappearing … Even as I breathe comes an angel to their keep…

This lyrical content appears to be a conversation that is carried on with one seeking a guardian angel and promises (pacts) to cement the relationship.

In Wicca and the New Age, they regularly contact their “guardian angels” using altars, candles, oils, incense, crystals, beautiful fabric and statues. Of course, these are demons pretending to be angels.

A former satanist had this to say:

“These spirits of the air known as sylphs are the higher class of elemental forces that take the form of angels and deceive those that are in spiritual [occult] churches. When properly invoked by occult prayer, they could easily compel the lesser demon to evacuate the victim’s body for them to occupy. But as time goes on the victim continues to develop series of problems.

“These sylphs are in categories; some of them are attracted by white candles while others are attracted by coloured candles … These spirits … easily send visions to the mediums concerning governments, nations and people. They disguise themselves like angels of truth, often quote scriptures from the Bible, when the medium is possessed and using the name of Christ as well. Their mode of communication is by whispering in the medium’s ear or meeting them in their realm.” [5]

Occult meditation is the key to contacting these fallen angels and Enya’s reference to an angel visiting the listener as he/she “breathes” in sync with the calming sensation of her music is quite understandable.

4. Smaointe… (Thoughts…)

Listen to me, so sad forever

I am lost without you and your wife

The great love in your life

She guided me. Both of you, be with me always, day and night.

I cry at the great loneliness, tears so sad, and you sleeping in the quiet, green grave. In deep peace. There was happiness but it went away

You followed your husband, the great love in your life. He guided me. Both of you, be with me always, day and night.

From the lyrics, it’s clear that the song is directed to the “Lord and Lady” of witchcraft.

Many Wiccans are duotheists – believing in an eternal mother Goddess who rules over the earth, moon, sky and the sea and her consort, a Byronic Horned God who presides over the sun, hunting, sexuality and vegetation.

In Pagan myths, the horned god dies and is reborn each year, while the goddess descends to the underworld to mate with the Dark Lord. These themes are observed in Wiccan feasts and sabbaths:

“In mainstream Wicca mythology, the Autumn Equinox marks the time of the descent of the Goddess into the Underworld. With her departure we see the decline of Nature and the coming of winter. This is classic ancient mythos also reflected in the Sumerian myth of Inanna and the ancient Greek and Roman legends of Demeter and Persephone.

“In modern Celtic Wicca/Witchcraft, the Autumn Equinox also bids farewell to the Harvest Lord who in the mythos of some traditions was slain at the time of Lughnasadh (a festival marking the beginning of the Celtic harvest season).” [6]

Thus, non-initiates might not grasp the full meaning of what Enya was singing (and it’s not even in English language). Her lyrics also sound a lot like a chant seen on a popular Wiccan website:

“Goddess my shield, my encircler,

Each day, each night, each dark, each light … In my lying, in my standing, in my watching, in my sleeping. Goddess be my strength everlasting.”

5. China Roses

Who can tell me if we have heaven,

Who can say the way it should be;

Moonlight holly, the Sappho Comet,

Angel’s tears below a tree.

You talk of the break of morning

As you view the new aurora,

Cloud in crimson, the key of heaven,

One love carved in acajou.

One told me of China Roses,

One a thousand nights and one night,

Earth’s last picture, the end of evening

Hue of indigo and blue.

A new moon leads me to

Woods of dreams and I follow.

A new world waits for me;

My dream, my way.

This appears to be poetic, but even at that, she brings in some codes which her Pagan or Wiccan listeners can fully decipher.

The two archetypal forms of the horned god of witchcraft is: the Holly king and king Oak. In some traditions, the Holly king represents the bright form of the horned god.

“A thousand nights and one night” is an expression based on a Tarot emblem which typifies death.

Witches believe colour blue stands for devotion, harmony or love while indigo stands for wisdom, insight or spirituality.

Also, they believe the new moon signals new openings or beginnings. So, when Wiccans sight the new (crescent) moon, they begin their spells geared towards new pursuits.

6. May it Be

May it be an evening star

Shines down upon you

May it be when darkness falls

Your heart will be true

You walk a lonely road

Oh, how far you are from home

The evening star is a code for their goddess. She is also symbolized by the five pointed star or pentagram. A New Age and occult researcher, Deena Conway, wrote:

“Pentacle, pentagram: five pointed star with one point up; symbol of the Goddess in all Her forms. In ancient Egypt, it was the star of Isis and Nephthys; in the Middle East, that of Ishtar. To the Celts it was the sign of the Morrigan. A sign of the Earth Element in Tarot … Repulsion of evil; protection.” [7]

7. La Sonadora

I; the autumn

I; the evening star

I have been an echo

I shall be a wave

I shall be the moon

I have been everything, I am myself

I; the summer

I; the ebony

I am the dreamer

Even though this was sung in Spanish, when you compare its English translation to a track titled “Deity” sung by Wendy Rule – who openly admits to being a witch – you can see the similarities.

It’s here

I’ve followed

A voice

To follow

I am the maiden

I am the mother

I’m the crone

I am the sea

I am the sky

I am the blood

I am the moon

This is not a coincidence. Both women drink from the same poisonous fountain of witchcraft.

8. Epona

Though this music is entirely instrumental, its title indicates who it was dedicated to.

Epona is the name of one of the dark forms of their goddess. Witches praise her as “the white mare, spirit of the wild” whose “hoofs beat on the sand.” A Wiccan scholar notes that:

“Among the Irish, a red horse signified death. Horse deities such as Epona, Medb (the goddess mare) of Tara, and Macha of Ulster (protector of horses) are chthonic divinities of the dead.” [8]

Many Christian fans of Enya – I expect – would argue that since they do not subscribe to pagan beliefs and their use of New Age music is only for the benign purpose of relaxation, these occultic influences can’t affect them. After all, Enya also has a song in which she made references to “God the Father”.

This line of argument may sound fine in theory, but practically, it is false and misplaced. Even in the light of the above evidence, such thinking is muddled and in denial.

The Bible expressly forbids the practice of enchantments (keshaphim) and trafficking in spirits in Deuteronomy 18:10-13.

The rendering of the Hebrew keshaphim is “muttered spells” or “incantations,” rendered “sorceries” in Isaiah 47:9 Isaiah 47:12 , i.e., the using of certain formulae under the belief that men could thus be bound.

God’s Word also forbids sorcery (Greek: pharmakeia) which includes physical objects or magick that impacts the human senses. Enya’s music (and the others like hers) are geared towards controlling people’s minds and bringing them in touch with the demonic.

Notes

[1] “New Age Music” https://www.encyclopedia.com/media/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/new-age-music

[2] Rachel Alexander, Myths, Symbols and Legends of Solar System Bodies, Springer: 2014, p. 190.

[3] https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/vela-constellation/

[4] Brian Campbell, Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome, University of North Carolina Press 2012, p. 141.

[5] “I Refused Hell” transcript of Monday Romanus Ekeocha’s testimony. Christian Alive vol. 2 no. 14, (2006), p. 2.

[6] Encyclopedia of Wicca and Witchcraft, Raven Grimassi, Llewellyn, 2000, p. 37.

[7] Deena J. Conway, Maiden, Mother and Crone, St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn, 2003, p. 179.

[8] Encyclopedia of Wicca and Witchcraft, p. 225