The Dangers of Eastern Alternative Medicine (II)

In part one, the occult principles underlying alternative medicine were highlighted. Now let’s delve into some examples of these techniques and their potential dangers.

1. Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a key component of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). It involves stimulating specific points of the body (acupoints) using thin sterile needles. Acupuncture has been alleged to cure dysentery, headache, neck pain, stroke, post operative pain and even hypertension.

Various scientific studies however declare that there are little evidence of its effectiveness or long term benefit. Other studies indicate that acupuncture works mainly due to the placebo effect. Scientists have been unable to cure people by merely engaging in unspecific needle stimulation, thus, what makes acupuncture effective is not physical.

Acupuncture originated in China circa 100 BC from the traditional Chinese text, The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine. It spread to Japan and Korea in the 6th century AD and was adopted by Europe in 17th century. In the 20th century, it spread to Western countries.

Acupuncture is based on the occult principles of Taoism. In this system, chi/qi, yang and yin, zang fu, meridians and acupuncture points play vital roles in sustaining the human body. In this occult philosophy, when the body’s organs are deficient in a proper supply of cosmic universal energy (chi), it creates an inbalance or disharmony which results in diseases or pain.

The chi is said to flow from the body’s primary organs (zang-fu organs) to the “superficial” body tissues of the skin, muscles, tendons, bones and joints, passing through invisible channels called meridians. Acupuncture needles are often inserted into locations along these meridians (acupoints) to stimulate the flow of the blocked chi in restoring bodily health. This is not science and can’t be explained scientifically, it’s psychic healing.

As TCM spread to the West, other theories undergirding acupuncture emerged, resulting in conflicting theories and claims such that “TCM practitioners disagree among themselves about how to diagnose patients and which treatments should go with which diagnoses. Even if they could agree, the TCM theories are so nebulous that no amount of scientific study will enable TCM to offer rational care.” [1]

This therapy is at best, a dice game. There also the potential danger of misdiagnosing serious illnesses if applied. Given that acupuncture is based on an occult model of the human body, there’s a possibility of opening patient’s spiritual portals. A person can get cured of nausea and from there pick up arthritis.

In the occult human anatomy, there are acupoints that control sex and blood circulation. This meridian point, if activated by psychic means, can awaken a person’s sexual energies. There’s another point (called “Point of the Nail” grip in Mormonism) which can cause symptoms like convulsion, rage and even insanity if psychically stimulated! [2]

Some documented side effects of acupuncture include infections, nerve damage, punctured lung and convulsion. Several Chinese scholars in a review of the Chinese language literature found numerous acupuncture-related adverse events including pneumothorax, fainting, cardiovascular injuries, traumatic cataract, recurrent cerebral haemorrhage, thoracic and lumbar spine injuries. [3]

Conclusively, acupuncture involves an ancient pagan therapy inexorably tied to Taoism. It can open up a Christian to spiritual defilement.

2. Reiki

This is an ancient Japanese technique which stresses psychic healing through the manipulation of mystical life energies. From the meaning of its name “spirit vital energy” it involves tapping into a supernatural power or force and causing this power to produce healing.

Reiki is said to reduce stress, boost the body’s immunity, increase the body’s supply of “life energy” and make people feel calm. It is said to impact not just the body, but also the mind, emotion and spirit. Hence, it’s said to be used for personal transformation.

Reiki was “rediscovered” by Dr. Mikao Usui (1865-1926) in Japan. Apparently, after many years of studying ancient Indian writings, he invented a formula for activating and directing mystical life energy. He was said to have taught Reiki to more than 2,000 people during his lifetime.

In an attempt to fuse New Age medicine into mainstream medicine, the National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine has been funding researches attempting to validate Reiki as a healing therapy.

When scientists examined the works however, they not only found problems with their methodologies, but also their results, which appeared to lack validity or reliability. They found that there was no consistency in the application of Reiki; the same practitioner could produce different outcomes in different studies. Thus, it’s pseudoscience.

Some scholars note that: “Reiki postulates the existence of a universal energy unknown to science and thus far undetectable surrounding the human body, which practitioners can learn to manipulate using their hands.” [4]

When these Reiki practitioners pass their hands over a subject’s body they claim to look to “repelling energies,” “magnetizing energy” or “vibrations” that indicate where the balancing of chi is needed, but these ‘scientific’ terms are misleading. There’s no scientific evidence for chi or life force energy; they are spiritual forces.

Reiki instructors are often recruited by Reiki Masters. The master injects his psychic energy into the students, allegedly opening his psychic centers (chakras) and activating his ‘life-force.’ This is no different from how occult power is transmitted from a Hindu guru/sadhu to his disciples (shaktipat diksha). [5]

Reiki instructors are often initiated in a secret ceremony and when they reach the second degree, they are given the occult abilities to heal from a distance. These are purely demonic interactions, only that the demons have been given fancy names like “life energy,” “forces” or “vibrations.” As Christians we can’t control the Spirit of God, therefore, anybody that’s controlling or manipulating an “energy” of “force” is utilising demons.

Some specialists combine Reiki with elemental spirits. They can for instance, invoke a fire deity (“angel Michael”) using red candles with certain herbs and incense to effect cures. These techniques do work, but they are demonic and no Christian should try them out.

3. Homeopathy

This is a system of diagnosis based on the principle that the same substance causing symptoms in a healthy person will cure those symptoms in a sick person.

Homeopathy was developed by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843). He was a physician who while translating a book which described the effects of quinine or Peruvian bark on Malaria, decided to take the drug himself. He was struck with the idea that there’s a possibility that a substance which causes symptoms in a healthy person can possibly cure those symptoms in a sick person. From there, he began testing this drug on himself and others and believed his results confirmed his theory: like cures like.

Later, Hahnemann and his followers began administering minerals, herbs, and other substances to healthy persons, including themselves and recorded their observations. Today it’s alleged that homeopathy cures typhoid, dysentery and malaria.

The first problem with his theory – which forms the basis of homeopathy – is that Hahnemann confused the symptoms he felt after taking quinine as malaria symptoms. “Hahnemann had taken quinine earlier in his life, and it is quite probable that his experiment had caused an allergic reaction which can typically occur with the symptoms Hahnemann described. However, he interpreted them as malaria symptoms.” [6]

Second, his methodology eliminated controls by assuming that the particular substances he introduced into himself and others actually had the effects he observed. He took it for granted that people can experience physical sensations after taking certain substances through prior suggestion that the substance will produce those symptoms.

Third, he made experiences the determinants of truth, and this accentuates the flaw of homeopathy. Both the practitioner and the subject assume that relying on one’s own experiences is all the proof one needs that homeopathic medicine seems to cure. They never ask why or seek to investigate if other factors led to the cure instead of the homeopathic medicine. Again, we are confronted with the placebo effect.

Homeopathic medicines, following Hahnemann’s model, are susceptible to magical thinking. He discovered that certain substances produced some unusual reactions in some patients. He therefore sought to reduce the dosage given. In an attempt to find the smallest effective dose of the substance, he diluted it. He thought he found a curious phenomenon: the more diluted the substance, the more powerful it becomes.

Thus, homeopathic medicines are successively diluted until not even a single molecule of the original substance remained – supposedly making it more effective. [7] This is not science, because it’s not dealing with a physical substance treating a physical ailment, but relying on psychic power to produce a cure.

Hahnemann even admits that: “The diseases of man are not caused by any [material] substance,… but they are solely spirit-like (dynamic) derangements of spirit-;like power (the vital principle) that animates the human body. Homeopathy knows that a cure can only take place by the reaction of the vital force against the rightly chosen remedy that has been ingested. Thus, true healing art is…to effect an alteration in…energetic automatic vital force…” [8]

Homeopathy is based on metaphysical or psychic power. It invariably replaces conventional therapy especially in life threatening cases such as meningitis, asthma etc. which call for immediate treatment. A survey revealed that most homeopaths have a general negative attitude to immunization. All these indicate it is a dangerous therapy.

4. Therapeutic Touch

This is a healing therapy said to reduce pain and anxiety by placing the hands near the patients. Though it is said to cure people of stress, heal wounds and boost immunity, there is no justifiable scientific evidence of its efficacy.

Its practitioners state that by placing their hands on, or near a patient, they are able to detect and manipulate the patient’s energy field to produce healing. Like other examples of alternative or New Age medicine, it works based on occult principles, not science.

Therapeutic Touch (TT) was developed in the 1970s by Dora Kunz, a Theosophist and Dolores Krieger. While the practice is rooted in ancient mysticism, it has now been adopted as a course in several colleges and universities in various countries and adopted as a medical therapy in some hospitals in North America. The works used to substantiate TT such as Science of Unitary Human Beings by Martha E. Rogers are metaphysical works that only seem “scientific” at the surface level.

In a certain case involving Emily Rosa, a 9 year old girl who tested the efficacy of TT, its efficacy was debunked as 21 practitioners were unable to detect her “aura” or energy field being demarcated by a cardboard screen. The slightest possibility of locating even her hands were due to chance [9].

The whole concept of tapping into and manipulating energies is witchcraft. The “energies” being utilized in TT are not physical but spiritual powers inherent in spiritual beings. Therefore, for a person to utilize them, he must first be inhabited by demonic entities, and the patient can also become open to them. And be rest assured, demons can also heal.

A Wiccan Pagan Spiritualist who narrated her story on Obsession: Dark Desires, said:

“Bill [her husband] had a major stroke at the age of 40 … when I spoke with the doctors, I asked and I said “Is there not any hope?” and they told me, ‘No hope.’ I began to do healing touch which is where you actually give people energy, healing from the herbs (?), which comes up through your body and through your hands. With the grace of god, I was given him back, and three weeks, he was home.” [10]

Without much ado, it is safe to conclude that a Christian seeking alternative healing therapy is playing the equivalent of a Russian roulette. It may have offer some temporary relief, but at a huge spiritual price. In all, it’s important that we keep our physical bodies – God’s temple – free from defilement (1 Corinthians 3:17).

Notes

[1] Barrett Stephen, M.D., Be Wary of Acupuncture, Qigong and “Chinese Medicine”, December 2007.

[2] Bill Schnoebelen and James Spencer, Mormonism’s Temple of Doom, 1987, 31-32.

[3] Zhang et al., Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2010, 88(1): 915-921.

[4] Lilienfeld et al., Science and Pseudoscience in Clinical Psychology, Guilford Press, 2014, 202.

[5] Holistic Health Practices/ Part 35 by Dr. John Weldon, 2009.

[6] Samuel Pfeifer, M.D., Healing at Any Price? Milton Keynes: England, 1988, 65.

[7] Samuel Hahnemann, The Chronic Diseases, Jain Pub., India, 1976, 19.

[8] Organon of Medicine, 6th edition, New Delhi: India, 1978, 173.

[9] Rosa et al. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1998, 279 (13):1005-10

[10] Aired on Investigation Discovery July 5, 2017.

 

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Destructive Pacts and their Outworkings

As God was sending His people into the lands of the Canaanites who were involved in pagan worship, He warned them: “Do not make a covenant with them or their gods” (Ex. 23:32). God was warning them against entering into covenants with evil spirits. Some of them eventually “joined” themselves with pagan gods such as Baal (Num. 25:3, Ps. 106:28; Hos. 4:17). This “joining” implies a covenant.

A covenant is a binding agreement between two or more people or parties to get things done with penalty by contact or sacrifice. It’s also called a contract or pact. In The Mummy (2017) movie, Ahmanet, an Egyptian princess was shown making a pact with the Egyptian god of evil, Seth, to help her murder her rivals. In return she was to invoke him into a human body. This illustrates occult pacts between a person and a demon or deity.

A common pact is that made with elemental spirits. These are evil spirits associated with the four elements – air, water, earth and fire. Each class of spirits has identifiable rituals, symbols and operations. These “fantastic four” are also deployed in cinematic characters and storylines. In the Moana movie for instance, the 4 elements – including the fifth one (the spirit force) – all worked together. The green “heart of goddess Te Fiti” is actually a Bezoar stone (or Mustika pearl) used by real life witches and New Agers to communicate with elemental spirits.

Enya’s songs, obviously tailored for New Age listeners, make references to these elemental forces. Part of the lyrics of O Miraculum says in English:

To set sail, a wonderful thing
Wayfarers see the sky, the oceans and the earth
The sea, the sea under the evening star

In her Latin song, Tempus Vernum, she says:

Behold, the north, the south
Behold, the west and the east
Behold, the ocean, the sea …
Behold the earth, the star, the winter and the summer…
Behold the ray of the sun and the shadow, the fire, the water, the sky, the moon, the earth, the star

In the occult, these 4 elemental spirits are linked to the four cardinal points: water (West), fire (East), air (North) and earth (South). In many Wiccan traditions, the four seasons of the Western hemisphere and four other sun-oriented dates are called “sabbaths.” During these 8 sabbaths, their Horned god is ritually invoked into a male witch. [1]

In La Sonadora, Enya lyrics, translated into English say:

I; the autumn
I; the evening star
I have been an echo
I shall be a wave
I shall be the moon
I have been everything
I am myself

The two elements mentioned here are air (echo) and water (wave). The “evening star” is a title of the pagan great Goddess Ishtar, Astarte or Venus. These goddess forms are also associated with the moon and often invoked on nights of the full moon (esbats) through a Wiccan ritual called “Drawing down the moon.” [2] Fittingly, the CD of this music album, The Memory of Trees, has the picture of a full moon surmounted over Enya,

In Orinoco Flow, Enya focuses on the water element:

From Peru to Cebu hear the power of Babylon
From Bali to Cali far beneath the coral sea
From the deep sea of clouds
To the island of the moon
Carry me on the waves
To the lands I’ve never been

This is a poetic invocation of water spirits to transport the listener to their realm. This is a spiritual kingdom of a hierarchy of demons. One of their key rulers is called “Queen of the coast” (or Queen of the river). She and the many demons under her command wield control over many nations, families and individuals through fashion, music, aesthetics, inventions, finance, religions, sexual immorality and entertainment.

There is hardly a culture that does not acknowledge the existence of spiritual entities within water bodies, although many in ignorance and delusion worship them. In the Bible, apostate Jews worshipped a goddess named Asherah. The Bible mentions her images (1 Kg. 15:13), her prophets (1 Kg. 18:19) and the vessels used in her service (2 Kg. 23:4).

“In the Ras Shamrah texts, Asherah is the consort of El, the supreme god. She is mentioned as ‘creatress of the gods’ and ‘Lady Asherah of the sea,’ titles that are given to the most important goddess of the pantheon.” [3]

The name of this demonic queen varies from place to place; some even call her “Our Lady of Regla.” Latino music star, Celia Cruz, dedicated an entire track to her in Spanish:

Virgin of Rule, today is your day
Mother of water, my goddess Yemaya
You are the Queen
These songs that we give you o mother
Yemaya my mother, my mother
Ohhoho live Yemaya! [4]

In the first scene of Beyoncé’s Drunk in Love video, there was an eerie music with a focus on the image of a queen on a trophy borne by Beyoncé. She wears a pendant of an inverted triangle/pyramid in this scene. This is a witchcraft symbol of the water element. In February 2017, she released a poem for her twins, part of which says:

Mother has one foot in this world
One foot in the next
Mother black Venus in the dream
I am crowning Osun, Nefertiti and Yemoja
Pray around my bed
I can smell jasmine
I wake up as someone places a wreath upon my head

Osun and Yemoja are Yoruba names for the Queen of the river – believed to be “patron” of sexual lust, childbirth and divination. In witchcraft, Jasmine incense is used for rites involving lust, protection, dreams and money. Nefertiti was an Egyptian consort of Pharaoh Akhenaten who extensively worshipped the solar disk. It’s not a coincidence that this poem was released on February 2, Yemoja’s feast day.

Nigerian music star, Victor Uwaifo, spoke about his encounter with this demon:

“That particular day, I stayed really late till everybody had gone. Not long after, I observed that each time the waves advances towards me, I would move back, but the farther I moved the closer it came. Suddenly, I observed a figure coming towards me. I wanted to move away. I screamed … She said “If you see mammy water [Yemoja], never you run away.” I just thought the mermaid loved the music, otherwise it would have harmed me.”

He composed a song based on her words and it became an instant hit. When the interviewer asked if there’s a link between this encounter and his subsequent success, he answered, “I call it esoteric, a privileged knowledge not for everybody. From that time till today, I have been very privileged. I am a spiritual person, I have a chapel in my house.” [5]

Demons don’t just physically appear to people. Some evil covenants must have been in place. Many people consciously enter into these pacts for fame, wealth, success and supernatural abilities e.g water witching, breathing under water, healing etc. Others unconsciously enter into them by offering sacrifices at streams/rivers or lakes, ritual baths, consulting water priests/priestesses, sexual contacts with agents, use of paraphernalia and items dedicated to water spirits and participating in their festivals.

The annual Osun festival held in Osogbo, Osun State, is an instantiation of demon worship under the toga of “African tradition.” Every year, many religious tourists and devotees from within and outside the country troop to the Osun grove (which by the way, is registered with UNESCO) to make and renew their covenants with the Queen of the river.

One of these pilgrims said:
“I was married for over 10 years without the fruit of the womb and the pressure was becoming unbearable from my in-laws … I came to this river in tears and barely one year later, I was all smiles. The river goddess heard my cries and gave me a bouncing baby boy … I go to church but I remain grateful for what the river goddess has done for me.” [6]

Sadly, there are many “Christians” like this woman who “worshiped the LORD, but … also served their own gods” (2 Kgs. 17:33). They profess to follow the Lamb, but swear allegiance to the dragon. These water entities are monstrous beings that seduce and devour their preys like their master Satan (Is. 27:1). The devil and his imps do offer people beggarly fame, comfort and power for pacts, but they will all end here on earth.

In contrast, God enters into a covenant with as many accept Jesus as their Lord and Saviour and offers them every spiritual blessings in heavenly places and all that pertains to life and godliness by His divine power (Eph. 2:1; 2 Pet. 2:3) – only asking that we love, follow, serve and obey Him with all our hearts.

Notes

1. William Schnoebelen, Wicca: Satan’s Little White Lie, Chick Pub., 1990, 223
2. Margot Adler, Drawing Down the Moon, Penguin Books, 1986, 20
3. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, ed. Geoffrey Bromiley, 1979, Vol. 1 p. 317
4. Slightly re-arranged and translated using Google Translate.
5. Nigerian Entertainment Today, July 11, 2014.
6. Osun Osogbo: A Communion of Spirits, Mortals https://emekaumejei.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/osun-osogbo-communion-of-spirits-mortals/