The Goddess Delusion

Over the last few decades, there has been a fast-spreading paradigm shift from Christianity to paganism. This trend ranges from attempts to promote a feminized version of God to cults centered around a female divinity. “For the first time in two millennia” wrote Caitlin Matthews in Sophia: Goddess of Wisdom, “the idea of a Goddess as a central pivot of creation is finding a welcome response.” With the surge of feminism, Earth-centred beliefs and New Age spirituality, conceptual social and religious barriers are being broken down and many people are being led to adopt a form of female principle – whether by literal goddess worship or a mystical tap into the “feminine energy.”

Elmer Towns was apt to observe that:
“Many women turn to a female deity because they have been hurt by men. They may have been abused, raped, abandoned, or in some way violated by males in their lives. As a result, they may blame the heavenly Father, who is male. Notice, when people ask why God would allow starvation, cancer, or other problems in the world, they never ask why ‘Mother Earth’ or a female deity has caused the problems. It’s always a male deity that they blame. [1]

Ex-Wiccan High Priest, Bill Schnoebelen, reflected on the deceptive ideas that led him into goddess worship:

While the Biblical Jehovah is striking people with thunderbolts as they step out of line, their Goddess plays and frolics with her hidden children … She is everyone’s fantasy idea of a mother or lover: a gorgeous, compassionate woman who loves unconditionally, does not chide or require much of you, and who is totally available for both service and sexual intimacy. I fell in love with this image of the Goddess immediately.” [2]

Many Wiccans and Neo-pagans freely acknowledge that their Goddess is universally worshipped in countless cultures, traditions and rites worldwide. They admit that their goddess has emerged in different forms, with different names at various periods of history. These are all facets or archetypes of the same great Goddess. This global catholicity of the “great goddess,” however, exposes the diabolic veneer, because a historical overview of many ancient goddesses reveal them to be evil, savage and destructive. For example:

Kali – she is the major Hindu goddess of death, power and destruction. A Hindu text, Devi Mahatmyam, describes Kali as “armed with a sword and noose. Bearing the strange Khatvanga (skull-topped staff), decorated with a garland of skulls, clad in a tiger’s skin, very appalling owing to her emaciated flesh, with gaping mouth, fearful with her tongue lolling out [and] having deep reddish eyes…” She is also depicted wearing a skirt of human arms and accompanied by serpents.

Kali has been worshipped for centuries, perhaps millennia, by human sacrifice. The infamous Thuggee cult of India and Nepal were followers of Kali who strangled their victims as an act of worship to her. Although the British tried to wipe out Kali’s cult when they colonized India, their efforts failed. Much has been reported about the numerous human sacrifices to her in the last decade. As recently as 2015, a boy was sacrificed to Kali by a devotee in Kolkata. If all goddesses are one, then they are by no means benign.

Lilitu/Lilith – the Sumerian goddess Lilitu was depicted as having both the wings and claws of a bird. Some reliefs show her lower half as a serpent’s body or as a serpent with the head and breasts of a woman. Her visual representation closely resembles that of Maleficent in the 2014 Disney movie.

This goddess, under a slightly modified name, Lilith, is also worshipped in the West. Lilith is a figure out of Hebrew cabalistic folklore. She was believed to be Adam’s first wife who refused to submit to him and was sent out of the Garden of Eden by God while she was with child. Enraged at the perceived injustice, she gave birth and then bashed the baby’s brains out on the rocks by the Euphrates River. Another version of the myth says she devoured her children alive. Lilith is worshipped as the ‘Dark Mother’ or demon goddess presiding over feminism, infanticide, abortion and sexual defilement. She also relishes blood sacrifices.

Tanit – the BerberPunic and Phoenician goddess and chief deity of Carthage (modern Tunisia). She was associated with the heavenly bodies, war and fertility and regarded as a consort of Baal Hammon. She was often depicted having a lion’s head.

Archaeological and ancient writings points to animal and human sacrifices as part of her cult worship. Excarvations at ancient sites of her temple showed charred bones of newborns, and in some cases, the bones of fetuses and two year olds. [3]

Artemis – Greek goddess of the hunt, moon and childbirth. She is also called “the thrower of the dart or shooter” of death. A Wiccan writer says “Artemis had a reputation for liking bloody sacrifices, including human ones … Artemis who personified respect for animal life, accepts the necessity of the hunt, but only if the rules and the absolving rituals are observed. In most Goddess religions, a similar reasoning is applied to the fetus and the newborn. It is morally acceptable that a woman who gives life may also destroy life under certain circumstances.” [4]

Notice the strong link between goddess worship, feminism, sexual immorality and infant destruction.

Oya – also known as Yansa or Iansa, this Yoruba warrior goddess is worshipped in West Africa as well as in the Americas. She is the “patron” goddess of death, destruction, lightning and violent storms. Her name literally means “She tore [asunder]”. She is associated with cemeteries, marketplace and said to be queen over river Niger and the Amazon river.

Oya’s symbols are swords (or machetes), flywhisk and water buffalo. Her nine children are emblematic of the moon. She is a huntress (murderer) who presides over magick and evil wisdom. [5] She is also believed to be the mother of the Egunguns – embodiment of the spirits of the ancestral dead in Africa.

Coatlicue – Aztec goddess of the earth, moon, fertility, sexual pleasure and gambling. She is said to be one of the nine Lords of the Night Hours and the power behind all magic in the Aztec world. Her name literally means “skirt of snakes”. As Tlazoteutl, “she appears nude, riding on a broom. She wears a horned headdress with a crescent moon and she holds a red snake. She also has a crescent moon decorated on her nose …. represents the planet Venus. She is often depicted wearing a flayed human skin.” [6]

There is absolutely nothing gentle or good about these goddess figures. They are bloodthirsty fiends whose altars were drenched with blood of many souls. Yet these same entities are being invoked in Wiccan/Neopagan circles today.

Astarte or Ashtoreth – the chief goddess of war and sexuality worshipped throughout the Middle East and North Africa. Astarte is the Greek form of her name. Her symbols are the lion, horse, sphinx and a star within a circle indicating planet Venus (the morning/evening star). She is associated with the crescent moon and depicted with a child on her laps. Figurines of Astarte have been found at various archaeological sites in Israel showing the goddess having two horns.

A feminist author admits that “infant sacrifices were regularly performed in honor of, certainly, some forms of the goddess. It is recorded, for instance, that around the sacred stone which represented the goddess Astarte, hundreds of skeletons of human infants have been found… first-born children and animals were sacrificed to her.” [7]

From the Bible, we can see the dark, downward spiral when people dabble into goddess worship which we observe today as ancient paganism is being revived. After King Solomon was led astray by his pagan wives “He followed Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians, and Molech, the detestable god of the Ammonites. So Solomon did evil in the eyes of the LORD…” (1 Kgs. 11:5-6)

Centuries later, about 741 BC, King Ahaz “walked in the ways of the kings of Israel and even sacrificed his son in the fire, following the detestable ways of the nations the LORD had driven out before the Israelites” (2 Kgs. 16:3).

Then some decades later (about 721 BC), the Bible says this about the Israelites:

“The set up sacred stones and Asherah poles on every high hill and under every spreading tree… They bowed down to all the starry host, and they worshipped Baal. They sacrificed their sons and daughters in the fire. They practiced divination and sorcery and sold themselves to do evil in the eyes of the LORD…” (2 Kgs. 17:10, 16-17).

God has revealed Himself as the only true God and there is no “heavenly queen” ruling together with him (Is. 45:5). He is the embodiment of love and the “father of compassion and the God of all comfort” (1 Jn. 4:8; 2 Cor. 1:3). He desires all men to know and serve Him. Yet, many people are being led astray by another form of modern goddess delusion in a “Christian” garb: the cult of the Catholic Mary.

The “Virgin Mary” being worshipped in Roman Catholicism has become the “emergent” goddess archetype of our time, annually drawing millions of people from diverse churches and religions to her shrines and grottoes like the pied piper of Hamelin. Many apparitions and miracles of this Lady have been documented. What is particularly striking is, this Catholic Queen of heaven is demanding that the Vatican define a final dogma to make her the Co-Redemptrix with Christ:

“When the dogma, the last dogma in Marian history, has been proclaimed, “the Lady of All Nations” will give peace, true peace to the world. The nations, however, must say My prayer in union with the Church. They must know that “the Lady of Nations” has come as Co-Redemptrix, Mediatrix and Advocate. So be it!” [8]

New Agers are also receiving messages from this counterfeit Mary calling for a one world religion: “Each religion is worshipping, underneath the outer trappings, its Creator. It is the same Creator! Whether you pray facing the east or facing an altar or on Saturday or Sunday, it is all worship … All words which have been written in the Holy Books have been written by men in unity with the Creator.” [9]

Bible prophecy indicates that a diabolical female figure will gain universal prominence in the last days. Prophet Zechariah was shown a woman sitting in a basket lifted between heaven and earth which an angel of God called “wickedness” (Zech. 5:7-9). This could be Babylon the Great: the whore who rides on a beast in Revelation 17. This is the demonic religious force behind modern false worship and she will finally usher in the Antichrist in the Last days.

NOTES

1. Elmer Towns, Bible Answers to all your Questions, Thomas Nelson, 2003, 139

2. Bill Schnoebelen, Wicca: Satan’s Little White Lie, Chick Pub., 1990, 113.

3. Lawrence Stager by Paolo Xella et al., Phoenician bones of Contention, Volume 87, no. 338; 1199-1207.

4. Ginette Paris, The Sacrament of Abortion, Spring Pub., 1992, 34, 53.

5. Adeoye C. L. Beliefs and Religion of Yorubas, Evans Bros, 1989, 303.

6. Patricia Turner and Coulter Russell, Dictionary of Ancient Deities, Oxford Univ. Press. 2000, 470.

7. Esther M. Harding, Woman’s Mysteries – Ancient and Modern, Harper and Row, 1971, 138.

8. Message to Ida Peerdeman in Josef Kunzli, The Messages of the Lady of All Nations, 1997, 85.

9. Annie Kirkwood, Mary’s Message to the World, New York, 1991, 145.

Is Jesus a copy of Ancient “Hero” Deities?

naitivityOn December 23, 2016 a news headline read: “5,000 Nativity Scene found in Egypt.” It reports a reddish rock art found in 2005 by Marco Morelli, a geologist, in a small cave within the Sahara desert. It showed a mother and father standing over a newborn, with two animals present and what looked like the sun (?) on the right side. By terming this “a Nativity scene 3,000 before Christ” the liberal media was baiting the prejudice of the season. In the painting, a lion was painted at its top and a monkey below. How does this tally with Christ’s birth recorded in the Bible?

Marco said “when the baby is drawn above the parents, it usually resembles a birth or pregnancy in ancient Egyptian art.” Is this man an Egyptologist or why should his words be taken as authority? You see the inherent conclusion fits a ready made narrative: to portray Christ as a copy of pre-Christian mythical gods like Horus, Baal and Attis. That painting is more or else a coincidence; even if it is religious in nature, it fails to indicate ancient Egyptian religion was the prototype of Bible narratives.

A popular YouTube video Zeitgeist: The Movie, also attempts to parallel Jesus with ancient demi-gods worshipped prior to Jesus birth. Its narrator says:

“Broadly speaking, the story of Horus is as follows: Horus was born on December 25th of the virgin Isis-Meri. His birth was accompanied by a star in the east, which in turn, three kings followed to locate and adorn the new-born saviour. At the age of 12, he was a prodigal child teacher, and at the age of 30 he was baptized by a figure known as Anup and thus began his ministry. Horus has 12 disciples he travelled about with, performing miracles such as healing the sick and walking on water… After being betrayed by Tryphon, Horus was crucified, buried for 3 days, and thus, resurrected.”

There’s nothing new about these claims. They are old, disproved theories drawn from late 19th century agnostic works like T. W. Doane’s Bible Myths, George Frazer’s The Golden Bough and Arthur Weigall’s The Paganism in Our Christianity, which no scholar takes with any degree of seriousness in this century. They are urban legends and propaganda mush. Josh McDowell in A Ready Defense, listed 4 major fallacies of critics who make this “Jesus is a copy of ancient gods” claims.

a) Combinationism: they roll all ancient pagan religions into one box and assume they are monolithic, coherent and unified belief systems from 1500BC – 400 AD.

b) Colouring the evidence: they lace ancient myths with Christian terms to make them seem prototypes of Christian beliefs.

c) Oversimplification: they find something such as resurrection and claim that Christianity borrowed it from an ancient myth whereas there are startling conceptual differences.

d) Who influenced whom: critics assume that if there is an element in an Eastern religion as well as Christianity, the Christians must have borrowed from the Eastern religion, since the religion’s founder lived first. They fail to consider that the Eastern religion absorbed Biblical narratives into their own myths.

With these logical fallacies in mind, let’s examine the claims made in the Zeitgeist movie.

1. Ancient Egyptian religion wasn’t a coherent belief system that could be copied wholesale. As it evolved, so did its stories. The Oxford Guide: Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology says different forms of Horus are recorded in history and these are treated as distinct gods by Egyptologists. Ancient Egyptians viewed the multiple facets of reality, hence had different perceptions of the same multi-layered deity with various attributes.

2. The relayed myth of Horus is peppered with Christian and Jewish terms like “baptized,” “disciples” and “ministry” to further their agenda. There is no way ancient Egyptians would use such terms to refer to their religious rites. I cannot find the name “Anup” or “Asup” in any major ancient text. Only one reference to baptism is made and that refers to a ritual coronation for the pharaoh (and it varied in age, rarely 30). No reference work speaks of Horus and his baptism. These contrivances were deliberately made up by anti-Christians to mislead their viewers to assume similarities where there are none.

3. Where was it stated that Horus was born on December 25? In Plutarch’s account, Horus was born “about the time of the winter solstice … imperfect and premature” (Isis and Osiris, Loeb Classical Library, Vol. 5, 1936). This leaves a gap of weeks before or after December. In modern calendar, the winter solstice is Dec. 21/22, not the 25th. This even assumes that ancient Egypt used modern calendar, because ancient myths don’t specify any date at all for the birth of their deities. Notably, Jesus’ birth date is not known and celebrating Christmas on Dec. 25 has nothing to do with the winter solstice.

4. In Plutarch’s account, Isis used her magic powers to raise Osiris and fashion a golden phallus to conceive her son. It clearly wasn’t a virgin birth as that of Christ.

5. Horus wasn’t visited by 3 kings, didn’t teach in any temple, had no 12 disciples and didn’t heal the sick. Horus battled Set for 80 years and won, finally becoming a patron of Lower Egypt. Horus wasn’t crucified either. Egyptian texts spoke of Isis and “describes the death of Horus through the sting of a scorpion… Thoth now appeared to her and advised her to hide herself with her unborn child” (The History of Isis and Osiris, Summary: VIII, lxxiv).

This incident occurred long before Horus’ adulthood and Thoth purged the venom from his body. You see, once you consult the source of the myth, a vastly different picture is seen. This is why one good way to refute such arguments is to ask for the original sources of the myths. The critic will either become silent or sing another tune.

6. Horus did not resurrect from the dead. Egyptian myths claim Osiris came to life again in Horus, but this is even far off the bat from Christ’s resurrection. The critic is oversimplifying “resurrection” and trying to parallel it with that of ancient Egypt. This is at best, intellectual dishonesty.

Some other critics theorize that Christianity borrowed some ideas from Buddhism because Buddha was born before the time of Christ. Femi Aribisala, a self-acclaimed “scholar” who seems to be seeking relevance on social media, alleged that Phil. 2:12: “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling” was plagiarised from the Mahaparinibbana Sutta Buddhist scriptures. But here is the quote:

“And now, brethren, I take my leave of you. All the constituents of being are transitory. Work out your salvation with diligence” (Digha Nikaya ii. 155-56 Mahaparinibbana Sutta).

Buddhists don’t believe in sin and their use of the term “salvation” is attaining nirvana or nothingness – a concept utterly remote from the Bible. Comparing the dates of the written documents of Christianity and the religion from which the supposed plagiarism occurred quickly exposes the critic’s assertion. Manuscript evidence shows that the New Testament were written between 50-90 A.D.

But the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha), even though he lived about 5 centuries before Christ were passed down orally. They became so fragmented and had variant interpretations that a council was held in the third century BC – hundreds of years after Buddha’s death – to purify his teachings.

“This council refuted the offending viewpoints and expelled those who held them. In the process, the compilation of the Buddhist scriptures (Tipitaka) was supposedly completed, with the addition of a body of subtle philosophy (abhidarhma) to the doctrine (dharma) and monastic discipline (vinaya) that had been recited at the first council” (Quoted from “Buddhism” Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia, 1998).

The earliest manuscript evidence of Buddhist teachings are fragments written on tree barks in 60 A.D. The Diamond manuscript, an early Buddhist text is dated 868 A.D., that is over one thousand years after Gautama lived. During this time frame, however, the Bible had been completed and Christianity had spread extensively through the East and West, so if there was a borrowing or plagiarism, it must have been from Christianity into Buddhism.

Some critics have claimed Krishna, Attis and Baal were prototypes of Jesus, but when you compare the myths of these deities, you will be amazed to behold the critics’ feeble attempts to roll different idols of different ages, characteristics and natures into one and re-cast them in the mould of Jesus Christ.

A Muslim writer, A. S. K. Joomal says the Jesus of the Gospels was patterned after a Mexican idol, Quetzalcoatl who was also a saviour born of a virgin, tempted by Satan, fasted 40 days and was “crucified and that the Mexicans looked forward to his second coming” (The Bible: Word of God or Word of Man, 145).

Here, again, we see a cheap attempt to Christianize a pagan deity by employing loaded Christian words like “saviour,” “crucified” or “second coming.” The Larousse’s New Encyclopedia of Mythology says Quetzalcoatl was one of the Mexican deities represented as a snake-bird and a white haired human old man with red face mask. He wasn’t crucified, instead, he sailed away with a promise to return to his people. These speculative theories actually tell more about the ethics and character of those disseminating them.