“Holy” Superstitions

Superstitions have moulded the thinking of many for centuries. In the West, breaking a mirror, seeing a black cat or Friday the 13th, are linked with bad luck. In Japan, houses are built without doors or windows facing the northeast so that demons from that direction won’t find the entrance. In the Philippines, shoes are placed beside the dead before burial for “St.” Peter to welcome them. In some parts of Nigeria, bad luck is attached to months ending with “ember.” These are superstitious beliefs rooted in fear and ignorance.

Science has helped dispel some of them. In the Middle Ages, the Catholic Church used “bleeding” wafers to fool people into believing that they change into the real flesh of Christ. But when microscopes were invented, the red pigment on wafers were found to be produced by a bacteria (Serratia marcenscens), which grew on wafers kept in damp places.

For years, the Yoruba god, Sopona was appeased to ward off smallpox. Today, we know that small pox is caused by viruses, not an earth deity. Superstitions develop when lies and fictions are made up to explain something which is less understood.

In Acts 17 when Paul visited Athens, Greece, he saw that the whole city was given to idolatry. Their lifestyle was described: “For the Athenians and foreigners who were there spent their time in nothing else but either to tell or hear some new thing” (v 21). The Pulpit Commentary explains that “Athenian religion ministered to art and amusement, and was entirely destitute of moral power. Taste and excitement alone were gratified.”

Apostle Paul said to the Athenians: “in all things you are very religious” (v 22). According to the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament (2:20), the Greek word translated as “religious” is deisidaimon which also means “superstitious.” It refers to fear of the supernatural. It was a practice that was all-embracing and non-discerning with a reference for all kinds of deities, religious notions, religious fads and religious claims.

The Athenian culture lacked all discretionary thought and would try anything with the word “religion” tacked to it. It was a system of mindless reverence and mindless religion with a love for newness and novelty. This same worldview is invading the church as Thomas Oden points out:

“The Babylonian captivity to novelty is the temptation of all modern reflection. It is invading evangelical leadership at an alarming rate in ways disturbing to evangelicals in the mainline who have suffered from its bewitchments for two centuries.” (Christianity Today, Feb. 9, 1998, 46)

Like Athens of old, the church today chases after novelties and religious fads. These are like “bandwagons” that many Christians jump on and circulate all through the Body of Christ until it crashes into a ravine or a more exciting wagon rolls in.

If you are in doubt, just read through any 5 popular Christian magazines and you would see are still stuck with Athens. Truth has been sacrificed for what is sensational and exciting. Will it sell? Publish it. Is it groovy? Bring it on. Will it appeal to people’s superstitious mindset? Say it and call it “revelation knowledge.” All through church history, this weapon diverts people from the simplicity of the Christian faith.

In the 4th century, Constantine’s mother, Helena, made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326 AD and found 3 crosses alleged to be those of Christ and the 2 thieves. The cross of Christ was “identified” when it worked miracles at the prompting of the bishop of Jerusalem. The problem is, its very doubtful Helena would have found the “real” cross of Christ in Jerusalem after 3 centuries because the Jewish law required crosses to be burnt after its use for crucifixion (Fausset’s Bible Dictionary, p 145).

The Encyclopedia of Religion (1:494) also notes that while Helena’s pilgrimage was historically correct, her discovery of the original cross or its miracle must have been later additions because these details didn’t appear until 440 AD- 114 years after the event. But superstitions are more exciting than facts.

Due to this legend, the use of crosses in churches and homes became official in the 5th century. By the 6th century, the use of the crucifix image was endorsed by Rome. People began to look up to crosses as sources of miracles and as talismans to ward off bad luck and evil spirits. Even today, some Christians still put crosses on their doors for this same purpose not knowing the origin of this silly idea.

The New Testament clearly shows that Jesus’ apostles didn’t hang crosses around their necks or carry it in their hands like those priests in vampire movies. They saw it as a device of death and shame (Heb 12:2). Their faith was not in a wooden or iron cross, but in Christ and His work at the cross (1Cor 1:17-18).

Let’s take a modern example -the Four Temperaments theory. This classifies everyone into sanguine, choleric, melancholy and phlegmatic temperaments, each having its set of characteristics. It is also said that temperaments determine which areas of spiritual calling we can best function. But human behaviour is so diversified and complex that it can’t be reduced into 4 neat categories.

If a sanguine and a choleric come together to have a child, which of the 4 temperaments will he/she have? Our genetic codes are unique, so our temperaments can’t be “predicted.” People can also be modified by their environments and other spiritual factors. Tim LaHaye himself wrote: “The temperament theory is not the final answer to human behavior, and for these and other reasons it may not prove satisfactorily to everyone” (Why You Act the Way You Do, p 58)

Yet this theory has been parroted from the pulpits to the hills on the pretext of vapid excuses: “Its scientific!” Hardly. “Its accurate!” Looks like Astrology. “It was taught by a great man of God!” Popularity doesn’t equal credibility. Just like Athens, facts are not exciting; novelties are.

Forms of “Holy” Superstitions

1. Prophetic manipulation– This is when people are made to comply with a certain belief or act because its coming from a prophet/teacher who must never be questioned. This trumps out Biblical discernment and breeds superstition.

In 2014, pastor Daniel Lesego of South Africa ordered his congregrants to eat grasses like a bunch of cows. Video footages later show Lesego walking on the bodies of his members like doormats and ordering them to drink petrol allegedly turned to apple juice, they all happily obeyed. If these members are not under a demonic spell, they are close to one.

Folks like these have a ready-made answer to every criticism: “the Holy Spirit told me to say/do it.” A woman told us she attended a church where the pastor claimed that the Holy Spirit says everyone present should bring out a certain Naira note, rub it on the floor like a ritual and drop it in the offering box. She felt this was unbiblical and didn’t comply. The pastor made a scathing reference to her as a rebellious goat. That is manipulation.

2. An obsession with supernatural revelations. This occurs when every spiritual experience or information from the spirit realm is accepted as divine, authentic and sometimes the yardstick. Whether its Nick Bunick who wrote of visits by angels who tell him he is the reincarnation of Apostle Paul in The Messengers or Benny Hinn who told his audience that he received directions for his ministry from the dead Kathryn Khulman in a vision, these experiences are never tested, but blindly followed. The moment some Christians hear the word “revelations” they lay aside their discernment and are ready to swallow them wholesale without realizing that revelations can be fabricated by a man or counterfeited by the enemy.

There are actually some Christians who enjoy listening to enemy spirits. Years ago, a demonized man spewed blasphemies in church which attracted spectators. The pastor there started to argue with the demon and interviewed it till it was casted out. The 4-hour long exchange was captured and published for reading pleasure (or displeasure) in the March 2005 Christian Alive magazine edition.

While this may excite the naive, this is exactly how superstitions get started, because demons are liars and we are not to seek them out for information. We don’t need to rely on them when we have the all-knowing Spirit of God who can tell us what we need to know. Interestingly, there are denominations today that adhere to certain doctrines based on someone’s vision or a demonic confession without a shred of Biblical authority.

When I was in a certain fellowship, I asked a leader why their doctrine forbids ladies from using jewelry. He answered “those above us have received revelation about it, so we have to accept it.” I found that answer too watery. I asked “what does the Bible say?” Why would God inspire hundreds of pages of Scripture and then leave out such a vital doctrine? This “revelation” was later decoded in one of their bulletins:

“Everything used for jewelries… are all from marine kingdom under the ground. And under the ground there are a lot of chemical reactions taking place. Mixture of things happening, join together to pump up all kinds of things.” (The Truth You Should Know, 5)

Now, this is very convincing isn’t it?

3. Reliance on tokens. This is a dependance on a physical object or amulet for spiritual protection. Some wear crosses, rings or rosaries believing it will protect them. Some drink or bathe with perfumed water; carry pictures of “saints,” “Jesus,” angels or talismans with them. Others place a baby’s head on an opened Bible and pray with candles or incenses.

4. Following omens and “signs.” Many Christians are programmed to attribute certain things to either good luck or bad luck e.g itching hands, hooting owls, wall geckos etc. Some are taught to avoid clothes with certain colours on certain days; cooked meats or fishes on Easter; foods in which human hair or insects are found or anything offered to them with a left hand. These are superstitious ideas. There is no such thing as “good luck” or “bad luck” in Scripture. What it teaches is blessings and curses.

5. Strange church practices. These are practices – ranging from the superstitious to the blatantly occult – that people indulge in a bid to “receive miracles” from God. They include: standing on a Bible in prayer, prayers involving rubbing eggs on the body and breaking it afterwards, praying nude, placing “prayer water” in dew for 7 days and drinking it as a ritual, ceremonial visits to “holy lands,” special mountains or “sacred rivers.”

Some folks believe your prayers can’t be effective unless you visit a mountain. That is an error. God is not limited by geographical location. In 2008, I visited a church camp site with a group and I was aghast to see how specific sites there had become idolized. They had a dirty “sacred” stream (the colour looks like Fanta drink) and people were drinking the water without bating an eyelash- because of miracles!

Others include: pouring of libation on new cars (an old pagan rite to honour earth deities), prayers with salts, snake handling and strange use of Psalms. When these practices start creeping into a church, in the name of “the Lord told me” or church traditions, let one thing be clear: you are dealing with sanctified superstitions.

How can this problem be addressed?

I. Faith in Jesus Christ. Our faith should be in Jesus and His perfect work on the cross, not in physical objects (Rom. 9:33). A solid faith in the name and blood of Jesus Christ dispels fear of the unknown, fear of witches or of demons (Prov. 18:10). It is faith in Christ that sustains a Christian in the time of trouble, not a chill in his spine, a sensation or signs in the moon.

II. Faith in God’s Word. Our faith should not be in our spiritual experiences or a human personality. You can’t be immune to deception if you exalt visions or dreams above Scripture. We also need to stop venerating human personalities. God can use an ordinary church worker to minister to you just as much as a world famous prophet. “He sent out His Word and healed them and delivered them from destruction” (Ps 107:20). He didn’t send out a personality.

III. Expounding the doctrines of Scripture. The Bible warns us to “teach no other doctrine. Neither give heed to fables and endless genealogies which minister questions…” (1Tim 1:3-4) “Till I come, give attention to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine” (1Tim 4:13) “Take heed unto thy self and unto the doctrine; continue in them” (1Tim 4:16). The antidote to falsehood is to present the truth. Show me a church that is not rooted in the truth of God’s Word and I will show you a church that be will be run over by human philosophies and superstitions. Its just a matter of time.

IV. Walk in discernment. No teaching or prophecy of a teacher or prophet should be blindly followed unless what he says or writes is in harmony with Scripture and the witness of the Holy Spirit in your spirit. You need to judge what people say: “Let the prophets speak two or three, and let the other judge” (1Cor. 14:29, 1Cor 2:16, Gal. 1:8). Not every vision, miracle or supernatural experience is from God and every doctrine or spiritual experience that is not from the Spirit of Truth, is from the spirit of error (1John 4:6).

Freemasonry- A Critical Look

Much has been written to expose Freemasonry, either by researchers or former Masons who are now Christians. In recent years, however, there is a burgeoning curiosity (if not obsession) among youths about Masonry. This is partly due to the influence of Illuminati-hunting conspiracy videos all over the internet, many of which conflate Masonry with the Illuminati. Also, Masonry is now becoming a strong visible figure in many nations. In fact, I have received inquiries about Masonry in the last 8 years than some other religious groups. This prompted me to re-visit it.

Masonry can be defined as a centuries-old, fraternal secret society entrenched in secret symbolism and rituals. To a novice, it appears as a club (like Rotary club or Lion’s club), but its not. Masonry professes belief in a Supreme Being, brotherhood, and morality and is only open to men above the age of 21. Masons meet in Lodges or in other fixed locations. They also have a Grand Lodge in each state, but no authoritative leader. Notwithstanding, writings of some high level Masons and Masonic ritual monitors (containing symbolic teachings and instructions) are representative of Masonic beliefs

Granted, many famous personalities like Winston Churchill, Ludwig Beethoveen, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Henry Ford, Thomas Jefferson, Adeyemo Alakija and Herbert Macaulay were Masons. Some modern political and religious leaders are also involved. King George VI, Queen’s Elizabeth’s father was a Mason. Prince Edward, the Duke of Kent (the Queen’s cousin), is also a Grand Master Mason. Over 16 US presidents and 20 vice presidents were Masons.

Why do many join Masonry? First, people are attracted by the sense of belonging to a brotherhood, particularly one through which they can attain political and economic connections. Second, many are attracted by the secret nature of Masonry- learning secret symbolism and esoteric knowledge- which seem to place them on a higher pedestal.

Third, Masonry has an outward appearance of being a humanitarian group. Masons fund education, medical care, build homes for the aged and hospitals for the sick. Masonry also appears to be a system of moral instruction. This is why many Masons also attend different Christian denominations.

As a report showed, of the 3.5 million Masons in the U.S., 1.3 million are Southern Baptists. Fourteen percent of Southern Baptist pastors and 18 percent of deacons are Masons (Calvary Contender, Jun. 1, 1993). In 2001, when a move was made to excommunicate Masons from an Anglican church in Australia, it erupted into a serious controversy as members claimed Masonry was just a fine Christian organization. Many “Christian Masons” resort to this same peroration. But such gnomic claims cannot stand up to scrutiny.

Let us first look at the structure of Masonry. The entry level, termed the Blue Lodge (blue is the symbol of Masonry) has 3 degrees: The Entered Apprentice, the Fellow Craft and the Master Mason. After these 3 stages, a Mason can proceed to the higher degrees either in the Scottish rite or the York rite. There is also the Irish rite in Nigeria.

The Scottish rite advances by numerical degrees with the highest being the 33 degree, while the York rite advances by chapter, council and commandery, with the highest level being the Order of the Knights Templar Commandery. Masons who do not climb up to the higher degrees can’t really know what Masonry is about.

Albert Pike, one of the fathers of modern Masonry stated:
“The Blue Degrees are but the outer court or portico of the Temple. Part of the symbols are displayed there to the initiate, but he is intentionally misled by false interpretation. It is not intended that he should understand them…” (Morals and Dogma, 819)

There are other quasi or “fun” Masonic groups, such as the Order of the Eastern Star and Daughters of the Nile for women; the Order of the DeMolay (for young men between ages 13-21), the Order of Job’s Daughters (for young women aged 11-20) and the Shriners, which is tailored to appeal to Muslims. Each group has its rites, emblems and ceremonies. Obviously, these are not clubs.

1. Albert Pike stated that: “Every Masonic Lodge is a Temple of religion and its teachings are instructions in religion.” (Morals and Dogma, 213). Masonic scholar, Albert Mackey also wrote: “Freemasonry may rightfully claim to be a religious institution.” (Mackey’s Revised Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, 2:846)

Masonry is a religion because it has its own revelation, temples, religious symbols, rituals, and its own deity called “the Great Architect of the Universe” or the “Creative Principle.”

2. Masonry is not only a religion, but also a mixture of different religions. Manly Hall, a 33 degree Mason explains:

“The true Mason is not creed-bound. He realizes with the divine illumination of his lodge that as a Mason, his religion must be universal: Christ, Buddha or Mohammed, the names means little, for he recognizes only the light and not the bearer. He worships at every shrine, bows before every altar, whether in a temple, mosque or cathedral, realizing with his truer understanding the onenness of all spiritual truth.” (The Lost Keys of Freemasonry, p 65)

This universalist ideology is incompatible with the core teaching of Jesus: “I am the way, the truth and the life. No man cometh unto the Father but by me” (Jh. 14:6). All religions cannot be true since they have conflicting revelations and concepts. To bow at every altar is an insult to each religion. Mixing dung and milk will not give chocolate fudge.

The Origins of Masonry

Masonry’s origins are not that clear. Masons cleave to the legend of their organization originating from the time of King Solomon, when he used skilled craftsmen to build the Temple in Jerusalem. The leader of these masons, Hiram Abiff, was said to be the only one who knew a “secret word” which was said to be the secret name of God. As the legend goes, Hiram was later murdered by his friends and the “secret name” of God became lost. Thus, Masonry is an attempt to re-discover this lost name.

Some Masonic scholars believe – with clear evidences – that the modern form of Masonry can be traced back to ancient mystery religions of Greece, Rome and Egypt.

“Our records inform us, that the usage and customs of Masons have ever corresponded with those of the Egyptian philosophers, to which they bear a near affinity. Unwilling to expose their mysteries to vulgar eyes, they concealed their particular tenets, and principles of polity, under hieroglyphical figures; and expressed their notions of government by signs and symbols, which they communicated to their Magi alone, who were bound by oath not to reveal them.” (Thomas Webb, The Freemasonry Monitor Cincinnati, 1787, 39)

Masonry is simply a modification of the ancient pagan cults which God’s Word repeatedly denounced. Note that ancient Babylon, Greece, Rome and Egypt worshipped the same set of gods and goddesses under different names. These mystery cults were also incorporated into the Kabbala, a system of Jewish occultism which forms the basis of Masonic worship. Albert Pike agrees:

“The Kabalah is the key of all Masonry and the occult sciences, and the Gnostics were born of the Kabalist.” (Morals and Dogma, p 626)

Kabbalism is linked to Gnosticism. What is Gnosticism? A Christian scholar explains:

“Gnosticism, however, was an attempt on an intelligible system seeking to answer the question ‘If God is good whence is evil?’ and especially if this God is omnipotent, Life, as we still know it, seems to be dualistic with constant conflict between evil and good. Gnosticism attempted to explain this by postulating that some inferior god had made the world and left it, to say the least unfinished. The world was made by some lesser power, ignorant, weak and almost evil and certainly was not the work of any supreme God. The Gnostics … [believed] Gnosis, knowledge, was superior to Faith. They claimed to possess exclusively the secret teaching of Jesus, passed on through disciples, males and females to the Gnostic teachers.” (Oshitelu G., A Background to Christian Philosophy, 2002, 54-55)

All through church history, Gnosticism had been a dangerous heresy attacked by many Christian writers. It was absorbed by the Marcionists and groups such as the Knights Templar. The Knight Templar was a military and religious order first established in 1118 AD in Jerusalem by 9 French knights under the leadership of Hugues de Payes.

The order was formed to fight in Catholic crusades and supposedly protect pilgrims on the way to the holy land. The group later came under the pope’s protection and became wealthy, attracting the elites. The Templars built temples which only the initiated could enter; embraced Gnosticism and became affiliated with the Assassins (a group of Muslim jihadists). They “were said to practice phallicism or sex worship and Satanism and to venerate ‘The Baphomet’ the idol of the Luciferians” (Edith Miller, Occult Theocracy, 1993, 144).

Reports emerged about homosexual orgies been performed in their secret rites which compelled King Philip IV of France to launch an investigation. A seal used by the Templars shows two knights riding on a single horse, with the hand of one on the private part of the other man.

In 1307, the Templars were arrested and brought before the Inquisition where they confessed to rites involving urinating on the crucifix and sodomy. Their Grand Master, Jacques DeMolay, was found guilty of being a homosexual, paedophile (lover of young boys) and worshipper of Baphomet, a deity with a half male- half female goat form. DeMolay and 3 others were burnt at stake on March 18, 1314.

The surviving Templars went underground with their cult. By the 17th century, they merged with the Rosicrucians who adhered the occult teachings Christian Rosenkreuz learnt from Egypt and Syria. During this period, skepticism was growing in Europe and stone masons were faced with the decline of the building of cathedrals. To keep their profession alive, the masons began to admit outsiders into their ranks. As these new intakes came in, they gradually introduced the philosophies and rites of the Rosicrucians and Templars into masonry. This was how Freemasonry was born. The first Masonic lodge was built in England in 1717.

From the higher degrees of Masonry emerged the Illuminati, founded by Adam Weishaupt on May 1, 1776. But the Illuminati was suppressed by European leaders in the 1800s. As Masonry grew into the 19th and 20th century, it was shipped over to Africa. The racist mindset of the 1800s was evident in Albert Pike:

“I took my obligations from whitemen, not from negroes. When I have to accept negroes as brothers or leave Masonry, I shall leave it.” (Delmar Darrah, History and Evolution of Masonry, 1954, 319)

“Who Goes There?”

Masonic initiation is where the mask finally falls off revealing a diabolical side. I will be contrasting the initiation rites of Masonry and Wicca (witchcraft) to show you the similarities.

I. Before a person can join Masonry, he has to be invited and recommended by a Mason. In the same vein, a candidate to be initiated into Wicca is recommended and screened by a witch on the inside.

II. The candidate is first made to stand outside the Lodge. Someone from the inside asks him: “who comes here?” He replies by saying “I am in darkness and I want to be brought into the light of Masonry.” For a Christian joining Masonry, this statement implies a denial of Jesus Christ, who is the Light of the world (Jh 8:12). When a Christian denounces the Light of Christ as darkness and claims to seek “the light” of Masonry, at that point, he has rejected Jesus Christ for Satan.

III. The candidate is stripped, blindfolded and tied with a rope and led to the eastern side of the Lodge. In witchcraft, the candidate is also stripped, blindfolded and placed at the edge of the magick circle.

IV. The candidate is made to kneel before the Worshipful Master. A compass is used to prick his chest and the blindfold is removed. In Wicca, the initiate led before the High Priest or Priestess, and a sword is held to his chest. Someone says to him “who goes there?” He replies “one from the world of darkness.”

V. The candidate swears an oath with his blood to keep all of Masonry’s secrets or die a violent death. In Wicca, the same wording as the Masonic oath is used, but is milder. If Masonry is “just a club” as Masons claim, why do they bind themselves under a death curse to maintain its secrets? That is devilish (Matt. 5:33-37).

VI. In both Masonry and Wicca after removing the blindfold, the initiate faces a lighted candle intended to bring “illumination.”

Other similarities are:
a) Both Masonry and Witchcraft have 3 major degrees. In Wicca they are called first, second and third grade.

b) They both venerate the reproductive organs, though witches also venerate them in animals.

c) They both have tools corresponding to the human reproductive organs. At the entry level Masonry, the compass and square represent the male organ and female organ respectively. In Wicca, the athame and chalice stands for these as well.

d) They are both secret societies and they both answer the name “Craft.”

e) Masonic prayers end with “so mote it be” while Wiccan spells or rites also end with “so mote it be.”

f) They both purify their circles before rituals.

g) They both believe in a “being of light” or Lucifer.

This explains why many 20th century witches and occultists were also Masons e.g Aleister Crowley (founder of the Thelema cult), Dr. Theodore Reuss (head of the Ordo Templi Orientis), Gerald Gardner (the Wiccan “revivalist”) and MacGregor Mathers (founder of the Golden Dawn occult society). A religion that attracts witches and sorcerers should have no attraction for a true Christian (1Cor 6:12).

The Masonic “Jesus”

Masonry teaches that Jesus was one of the saviours sent to every nation:

“The Hindus called him Krishna; the Chinese, Kioun-tse; the Persians, Sosiosch; the Chaldeans, Dhouvanai; the Egyptian Horus…the Christians, Jesus; Masons, Hiram.” (Peter Henry, Kentucky Monitor, 1941, xv).

Jesus Christ stands different and unique from all the mythological characters or dead heroes men have deified in religions. This blasphemous idea contradicts John 14:6, Acts 4:12, Rom. 10:9-10, Phil. 2:9-10 and ITim. 2:5. Masonry also denies the Deity of Christ and regard it as a legend:

“And as little do we tell the sincere Christians that Jesus of Nazareth was but a man like us, of His history [is] but the revival of an older legend.” (Ibid, 524)

Since Masonry teaches a false Jesus, it also teaches a false gospel of works:

“[Masons are] reminded that purity of life and conduct so essentially necessary to his gaining admission into the Celestial Lodge above where the Supreme Architect of the Universe presides.” (Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachussetts, 1989, 34)

This contradicts John 5:24, Romans 5:1, Ephesians. 2:8 and several other Scriptures that affirm salvation by grace through faith.

The God of Masonry

Albert Mackey wrote:
“Be assured that God is equally present with the pious Hindu in the temple, the Jew in the Synagogue, the Mohammedan in the Mosque and the Christian in the church.” (Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, 1921, 619)

Can you see where this leads? Even Satan can easily be accommodated within this framework. We can add that Mackey’s god is the same god also present with a witch in her coven. Apart from its endorsement of polytheism, Masonry’s syncretic philosophy is a rebellion against God’s most sacred command: “Thou shall have no other gods before Me” (Ex. 20:2).

Since Masonry rests on the fallacious assumption of “discovering the lost name of God,” as an initiate climbs higher, he learns some secret names and passwords that clearly show the identity of the Mason’s god. In the 17th degree of the Scottish rite, Masons are given the secret passwords JAHBULON (or JUBULUM) and ABBADON.

The name JAHBULON (JAH-BUL-ON) is a combination of JAH, an abbreviated form of the name Jehovah; BUL, another name for Baal or Bel, a pagan fertility deity, and ON a mystical name of Osiris, an Egyptian sun god. This is a deliberate insult to the one true God of the Bible. The name ABADDON has nothing to do with God either. Its the name of the “king of the angel of the bottomless pit” (Rev. 9:11).

An ex- 32 degree Mason describes the “last supper” rite in the highest level:

“The high point of the K[nights] T[emplar] initiation is when a candidate is brought before a large triangular table covered in black velvet illuminated by candles and containing eleven silver goblets and a human skull enthroned on the Bible (skulls feature prominently throughout this initiation)…The candidate is asked to partake of five libations, (toasts). The first three libation are given, respectively, to the memory of Masonic heroes King Solomon; Hiram, king of Tyre and Hiram Abif. The fourth libation is to the memory of Simon of Cyrene, and the fifth is the most sinister of all. The candidate is never told to whom the fifth libation is drunk (it is “sealed”) and it is offered to him in a human skull!…” (William Schnoebelen, Masonry Beyond the Light, 67-68).

Albert Pike said to the Supreme Council:

“That which we must say to the crowd is: we worship a god, but it is a god that one adores without superstition…the Masonic religion should be maintained in the purity of the Luciferian doctrine….Yes, Lucifer is God and unfortunately, Adonay is also God. The true and pure philosophical religion is the belief in Lucifer, the equal of Adonai. But Lucifer, God of light and God of good is struggling for humanity against Adonay, the God of darkness and evil.” (A. C De La River LaFemme, July 4, 1889, p. 588)

In the twisted foolsophical religion of Masonry, Lucifer is good and God is evil. How devilish! Lucifer is a created being and can never be equal to God the Creator. How can a person adhere to these Luciferian doctrines and at the same time claim to be Christ’s follower?

Manly Hall informs us:
“When the Mason learns that the key to the warrior on the block is the proper application of the dynamo of living power, he has learned the mystery of the Craft. The seething energies of Lucifer are in his hands, and before he may step onward and upward, he must prove his ability to properly apply energy.” (The Lost Keys of Freemasonry, 48)

The “application of the power…mystery of the Craft…seething energies of Lucifer” all describe one thing: witchcraft! This is why Masonry brings spiritual death to individuals, families and churches because God’s sentence of spiritual death rests on witchcraft (Deut 18:10-13, Gal 5:19-20).